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SCREEN-L  November 1994, Week 4

SCREEN-L November 1994, Week 4

Subject:

Re: RE; Kurosawa

From:

wheeler dixon <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Film and TV Studies Discussion List <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Wed, 23 Nov 1994 13:57:49 CST

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----------------------------Original message----------------------------
>
> ----------------------------Original message----------------------------
> > I am interested in getting some response to the topic of using
> > montage in film to acheive characterization.  Can it be used such as
> > Eisenstien's typage, or is montage not semiotic enough to
> > characterize?
>
> Try Akira Kurosawa's  work, which, in teerm's of editing, follows many of
> Eisensteins theories. As far as character and montage, Look at 'Ikiru',
> 'High and Low', and 'Sanshiro Sugarta' for starters. Also, Stephen Princes
> pretty good, albeit slightly diffucult to find, work "The Warrior's
> Camera: The Cinema of Akira Kurosawa" discusses his use of montage,
> although not neccesarily in the area of character.
>
> You should find something of value towards this end in Most of Kurosawa's
> work...
> --Mark
> [log in to unmask]
>
While not diminishing Kurosawa's direction, which is particularly
sensitive with actors, as in THE LOWER DEPTHS and my personal
favorite, HIGH AND LOW (but only in Scope, please), we should not
forget that all of Kurosawa's second unit stuff, including the
train/kidnapping/ransom sequence in HIGH AND LOW, Mifune as pincushion
at the end of THRONE OF BLOOD, not to mention all the battle scenes in
RAN, were actually directed by Inoshiro (Ishiro, as Kurosawa called
him) Honda. Honda is remembered solely for such film as MOTHRA and
GOJIRA,and they're fine films on their own generic turf, but Honda's
contibution to the kinetic editing and stylishly violent setups in
Kurosawa's film shouldn't be overlooked. Wheeler Winston Dixon

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