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Here are a few essays which deal with police reality programming.  The first
two I only have in conference paper form; however Anna William's essay was
published in Camera Obscura sometime in the mid-90s.  Ed O'Neil might be
able to let you know (on this list) if he's published his essay somewhere.

Anna Williams, All in the Family: The Representation of Crime in *America's
Most Wanted*

Ed O'Neil: The Seen of the Crime: The Construction of the Domesticd in
Police Reality Programming

Gray Cavender and Lisa Bond-Maupin:  Fear and Loathing on Reality
Television: An Analysis of *America's Most Wanted* and *Unsolved Mysteries*
(Sociological Inquiry, V68 No3, August 1993)

Here are two essays which deal with cop shows within wider contexts:

Ib Bondebjerg:  Public Discourse/Private Fascination:  Hybridization in
*True-Life-Story* Genres (Media, Culture and Society, V18, Sage Publications
1996)

Annalee Newitz: White Savagery and Humiliation, or a New Racial
Consciousness in the Media (in White Trash, eds., Matt Wray and Annalee
Newitz, Routledge, 1996)


Hope one or more of these is helpful,

Bethany Ogdon
Hampshire College


----------
>From: Michelle McMerrin <[log in to unmask]>
>To: [log in to unmask]
>Subject: Re: Teaching Magazines crime/police shows
>Date: Tue, May 18, 1999, 7:57 AM
>

>May be a bit outdated, but Televsion Culture by John Fiske (Routledge)
>has a good angle on what would be 'classic' cop shows now - Miami Vice,
>A Team, Cagney and Lacey. Good for undergrads.
>
>Hope this helps
>Michelle
>
>----
>For past messages, visit the Screen-L Archives:
>http://bama.ua.edu/archives/screen-l.html

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