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For _The Road Warrior_, it was because _Mad Max_ had never been released
in the US when _Mad Max 2_ premiered, so it was like the deletion of the
"III" from _The Madness of King George III_--they were afraid too many
people would pass up a sequel.  _Hoosiers_ was retitled _Best Shot_ in the
UK, because (apparently) not enough British people knew what a Hoosier
was.  Perhaps _Trainspotting_ could have used a new title for US release,
but it would probably be a worse title than _Best Shot_.  It seems to be
used primarily to eliminate idioms that might not be understood in another
culture, even though they speak the same language.

Scott

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Scott Andrew Hutchins
http://php.iupui.edu/~sahutchi
Oz, Monsters, Kamillions, and More!

"Colorless green ideas sleep furiously."--Noam Chomsky



On Tue, 23 Feb 1999, Kate Butler wrote:

> Susan writes,
> >The only original and decent thing about the American "re-make" of La
> >Femme Nikita was the heroine's love of blues singer Nina Simone. This
> >otherwise embarrassing film is called "Point of No Return," with Bridget
> >Fonda, Gabriel Byrne and Harvey Keitel.
>
> This film (the U.S. version) was released as 'The Assassin' in Australia
> which I think is a much stronger title. I have heard of this happening
> before with Australian films where the title is deemed to be too parochial
> perhaps ('Mad Max 2' here was released as 'The Road Warrior' in the U.S. -
> I remember a national competition being run to come up with the new title).
> Does anyone know the purpose of title changes for different markets?
>
> Kate Butler
>
>
> _____________________________________________________
> Kate Butler
> Department of Visual Communication
> RMIT University, Australia
> [log in to unmask]
>
> ----
> Online resources for film/TV studies may be found at ScreenSite
> http://www.tcf.ua.edu/ScreenSite
>

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