Print

Print


It is the (perceived) threat of castration (by the father) which makes the
male child
suppress his desire for the mother till such time when he can find himself
a female mate. Females thus become objects for exchange among men, and the
family system is created.
 
When the male child in the post-oedipal stage begins entry into the
symbolic order, the process is ensured by a threat of castration ("lack"
of the phallus). For a good description, read "Key Concepts in Cinema
Studies" by Susan Hayward (Routledge, London).
 
On Sat, 18 Apr 1998, Ken Mogg wrote:
 
> Please, could someone succinctly - yet convincingly - remind me just why
> Lacan in his psychoanalytical theory emphasised the need for a male
> person to be 'castrated'?  (You may use terms like Imaginary and
> Symbolic, of course, but do try to subordinate jargon to
> intelligibility.  Thank you!)
>
> - Ken Mogg (Ed., 'The MacGuffin').
>
>
>      --- from list [log in to unmask] ---
>
 
----
To sign off SCREEN-L, e-mail [log in to unmask] and put SIGNOFF SCREEN-L
in the message.  Problems?  Contact [log in to unmask]