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I am just catching up with old mail, so I hope the comments on split-screen
are not too much Old News.
 
In citing earlier uses of split screen, no one mentioned Richard Fleischer's
THE BOSTON STRANGLER, which makes very effective use of the technique in
place of standard crosscutting.  (And there are variations of the technique
in a number of credit sequences--MAN'S FAVORITE SPORT?, TWO FOR THE ROAD both
come to mind, although I may be misremembering.
 
What I've seen of Greenaway's more recent work suggests a new twist--more like
the "window-in-picture" feature that can be found in many newer TV sets these
days.  It looks to me as though video practices are a more important influence
on Greenaway than other splitscreen predecessors.
 
Don Larsson, Mankato State U (MN)
 
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