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Amy Dafler requests:
"I began my work looking at three films:  "On Golden Pond," "Cocoon," and
"Harold and Maude."  To aid my interpretation of these films, I read
Louis Gianetti's "Understanding Movies" and Marshall McLuhan's
"Understanding Media."  Taking advantage of the internet, I searched for
websites and articles that might include discussion of aging and film.
Here, I was lead to the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee's Center for
Twentieth Century Studies and their conference "Women and Aging."
 
To continue my research, I intend to view fims representative of many
genres.  These films include, but are not limited to: "Trip to
Bountiful," "Throw Momma From the Train," and "Making of a Marriage."
However, my main difficulty is locating literature about film and aging.
If you have any resources you feel are helpful, please respond privately
or to the list."
 
 
I'd suggest talking to your reference librarian.  A quick look at our none-too-
replete library catalogue found at least a couple of possibly relevant titles,
and you can find more through the FILM LITERATURE INDEX and other bibliographic
sources.  There are also works by de Beauvoir and many others that deal with
more theoretical issues of aging.  I'm sure the Milwaukee site can provide more.
 
I wonder, though, if you are limiting your sample of films to more or less
contemporary American films.  There is a wide range of films that could be
relevant to your study, involving shifting attitudes across time and culture.
Leo McCary's MAKE WAY FOR TOMORROW, for example, gives a very clear picture
of an old couple in the 1930s forced to rely on their children.  It makes one
understand why some people get so panicky when politicians discuss (or don't
discuss) Social Security.
 
There are also films from other countries, like Imamura's INSECT WOMAN,
Tornatore's EVERYBODY'S FINE, Tavernier's A SUNDAY IN THE COUNTRY,
Cisse's BRIGHTNESS, de Sica's UMBERTO D., and Ozu's TOKYO STORY, among many
others.
 
 
Don Larsson, Mankato State U (MN)
 
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