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In message  <[log in to unmask]> [log in to unmask] writes:
> Speculation:  if speeded-up action, as in Keystone Cops sequences, is for
> comedy, does slowing down the action, whether via slow motion or repeated
> action, suggest the opposite (whatever we want to take that to be)?
>
 
 
As a generalisation, I'd say yes.  Horror uses the slowed down image to
add dramatic power to something - particularly if something is to
be broken - such as the goldfish bowl in the Omen movie.
 
Lots of 'dramatic' moments in tv drama use various versions off slowed
down imagery - the most classic one I can think if that long slow,
elongated walk of "People Going To Do Something Real Important" such
as astronauts walking to their rockets, airman to wwrld war two
fighter planes etc.  Babylon5 uses it as a dramatic emphasis quite
often.
 
Some of these movements aren't true 'slow mo' but a technique of
shooting 'close up' from a great deal of physical distance away,
creating an effect of slo mo as figures move oddly in relation to
background figures.
 
 
--
Morgan
 
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