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In message  <[log in to unmask]>
 [log in to unmask] writes:
> Brian Winston, in his last book (*Claiming the real*, 1995), wrote that the
> interview "becomes, after *Housing Problems*, a staple of the Griersonian
> documentary" (p. 142). I had nevertheless the (false?) impression that the
> Griersonian documentaries from the 30s to the end of the 40s rarely used the
> interview. Does anyone have any example of such documentaries, especially
> those before 1945? More generally, I would appreciate any comment or
> reference on the beginning and development of this canonised documentary
> form in the 40s and the 50s.
>
> Thanks.
>
 
 
Rachael Low is a good place to start.  Both
 
_FIlms of Comment and Persuasion of the 1930s_
(Part of The History of the British Film 1929 - 1939)
[George Allen and Unwin, 1979 - PN1993.5.G7 ISBN 0-04-791037-2]
 
and
 
_Film Making in 1930s Britain_
[George Allen and Unwin  1985  PN1993.5.G7   ISBN 0-04-791042-9]
 
are good places to start.  As would be back tracking from Andrew
Higson's  _Britain's Outstanding Contribution to Film: The Documentary
Realist Tradition_ in Charles Barr's _All Our Yesterdays_
 
 
--
Morgan
 
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