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1. Films about screenwriting or screenwriters: SUNSET BLVD., IN A LONELY
PLACE, THE BAD AND THE BEAUTIFUL, THE FRONT (blacklisted screenwriters),
WHITE HUNTER, BLACK HEART, MRS. PARKER AND THE VICIOUS CIRCLE
 
2. TV films: A FACE IN THE CROWD (Kazan-Schulberg, 1957).  IT'S ALWAYS
FAIR WEATHER (Kelly, Donen, 1955) has some sharp parody of early TV, as
does THE MANCHURIAN CANDIDATE (Frankenheimer, 1962).  Of that late
70s-early 80s cycle you mention, the best are probably
Cronenberg's VIDEODROME (1983) and Scorsese's THE KING OF COMEDY (1983).
Also James Brooks's BROADCAST NEWS (1987) and the Italian THE ICICLE
THIEF (1990).  As for your last question, the U.S. film industry
has been deeply involved in TV since the late fifties, and several
studios tried unsuccessfully to get in on television at the very
beginning, when government antitrust bloodhounds (the Paramount Decrees)
were quick to squelch such attempts.  Now however, with the Paramount
Decrees quietly having been overturned by judicial appointees of that old
friend of the vertically integrated studio system, Ronald Reagan,
American entertainment companies are so intermeshed with each other that
good old independent lampooning of TV by the film industry is probably
impossible.  With four studios owning TV networks in the U.S. (Fox,
Warners, Paramount, and Disney), a FACE IN THE CROWD or NETWORK-style
attack probably would be unconvincing if not hypocritical.  Indeed Kazan
and Schulberg tried throughout the 80s to remake A FACE IN THE CROWD and
got nowhere--and I don't think it's simply because no one wants to remake
a flop!  Besides TV and cinema in the U.S. increasingly seem to have
switched their historic roles, with serious topics having a much greater
chance of airing on the omnivorous tube and the big screen seeming a
"vast wasteland" of cheap (actually super-expensive) thrills and
dumbed-down formula fare--and I write this in the heat of a
blockbuster-sated summer.  For instance, Spielberg and
Michael Crichton produce vacuous JURASSIC PARKS for the cinema, meatier
ER's for the networks.
 
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