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jroos @ cc.helsinki.fi (Jonna E M Roos) @ INTERNET writes:
>"...In the fabricated Matthew Pncelet, Robbins and Sarandon...ignore the
racial politics of the >death penalty with its gross ower-representation of
African Americans and Latino persons on the >nation's death rows and,
particularly the outrageous over-representation of African Americans >on
Lousiana's death row... The fabrications of the film "Dead Man Walking" expose
Robbins'
>and Sarandon's lack of understanding of the political and social issues
>surrounding death as punishment."
>
>I found Farmer's critique relevant and so true. There are more prisons than
schools and >governement is putting whole generation of African Americans and
Latinos to prison. In doing >so, they just wipe the problem under their carpet.
 
Was the author saying the film misrepresents death row because Poncelet is
white?  He wasn't supposed to be a literal composite of all prisoners, or even
representative -- I remember reading in the press that he was a composite of
the two or three real inmates the nun counseled before their deaths.  If it
wasn't Poncelet's race that the author objected to, what was the problem?
 
I saw this film as a look at the death penalty through one specific case, and
in that sense I thought it was a real success; it's not meant to be an
indictment of the entire judicial system (who to put in prison, etc.) -- only
the isolated issue, in one case.
 
Molly Olsen
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