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This message was sent to me from Larry Cuba.  He asked me to forward it to
SCREEN-L.  I don't have any more information on this program, but you can
get more information from:
http://spurlin-4.fas.harvard.edu/~www/hfa_screenings.html.
 
Maureen Furniss
 
>To: friends of abstract film,
>    friends who live in the Boston area,
>    and both.
>
>
>The attached document describes a series of abstract film
>screenings to be held Dec 7-11 at the Harvard Film Archive,
>Carpenter Center for the Arts, Harvard University.
>
>Considering that they're screening 140 films in 17 screenings
>during the four-day period, i don't think the curator is
>exagerating when he says it's "The most comprehensive retrospective
>of abstract films ever mounted"  (except maybe for the 'Film as Film'
>program that the Brigit Hein put together in Cologne back in the 70's)
>
>If you have any difficulty reading it, you can also access it
>from the following web site:
>
>http://spurlin-4.fas.harvard.edu/~www/hfa_screenings.html
>
>or let me know and i will try to send it to you again.
>
>see you there!
>
>regards,
>cuba.
>
>
>--PART-BOUNDARY=.19511161504.ZM25815.zkm.de
>X-Zm-Content-Name: brak.txt
>Content-Description: Text
>Content-Type: text/plain ; name="brak.txt" ; charset=us-ascii
>
>The information below is from the Screening Schedule of
>The Harvard Film Archive of the Carpenter Center
>for the Arts which can be found on the following
>web page:
>
>http://spurlin-4.fas.harvard.edu/~www/hfa_screenings.html
>
>
>December 7:       December 8:    December 9:
>
>ARTICULATED       7:00 Mary      10:00 Spirit
>LIGHT             Ellen Bute &   Stream Storm
>                  Dwinell
>December 7-11     Grant          1:00 Grant,
>                                 McLaren,
>The Emergence     Lecture:       Lee,
>of Abstract       Cecile Starr   Crockwell
>Film in
>America           8:30           2:00 Can
>                  Brakhage       Language
>LECTURES, FILM    Trilogy I      Describe
>SCREENINGS &                     Abstract
>PANEL             9:15 Oskar     Film?
>DISCUSSIONS BY    Fischinger
>THE WORLD'S                      3:00 Mary
>FOREMOST          Lecture:       Ellen Bute
>AUTHORITIES ON    William
>NON-OBJECTIVE     Moritz         4:00 Len Lye
>FILMMAKING
>                                 7:00 James
>STAN BRAKHAGE,                   Whitney
>
>ROBERT HALLER,
>WILLIAM                          Lecture:
>
>MORITZ, &                        William
>
>CECILE STARR                     Moritz
>
>
>THE MOST                         8:30
>
>COMPREHENSIVE                    Brakhage
>
>RETROSPECTIVE                    Trilogy II
>
>OF ABSTRACT
>FILMS EVER                       9:15 James
>MOUNTED                          Davis & Hy
>                                 Hirsh
>8:30 Before
>Maya Deren:                      Lecture:
>American                         Robert
>Avant-Garde                      Haller
>Cinema
>
>Vlada Petric
>in person
>
>
> December 10:           December 11:
>
> 10:00 Analytical
> Abstractions
>                        9:30 Brakhage
> 1:00 Hy Hirsh          Trilogy
>                        (complete)
> 2:00 Hilla Rebay
> and the
> Guggenheim Nexus
>
> 3:00 Whitneys'
> Early Works
>
> 4:00 James Davis
>
> 7:00 James
> Sibley
> Watson/Melville
> Webber
>
> Lecture: Robert
> Haller
>
> 8:30 Brakhage
> Trilogy III
>
> 9:15 Hands On
> Filmmaking
>
> Lecture: Stan
> Brakhage
>
>Featured speakers
>
>Stan Brakhage, beginning his career in 1953, has made hundreds of films of
>varying lengths, styles and formats. In the past decade, Brakhage has shot less
>representational imagery, turning his explorations to the pure realm of
>hand-painted cinema. Brakhage has profoundly influenced generations of film -
>makers, critics and viewers. His ideas and artistic contributions have also
>touched a wide circle of poets, artists and musicians.
>
>Cecile Starr has taught film at Columbia University and The New School in New
>York City, has lectured extensively in the U.S. and Europe, and has written
>several books (Discovering the Movies, Experimental Animation) and numerous
>articles. She is the founder/director of the Women's Independent Film Exchange.
>
>William Moritz teaches in the film and video faculty at the California
>Institute of the Arts. The author of numerous articles on abstract film, Moritz
>is also a filmmaker himself, having made twenty-nine short films and videos.
>
>Robert Haller is the Executive Director of Anthology Film Archives. He has
>edited two books of writings by Stan Brakhage and two books by Jim Davis. He is
>preparing books on Ed Emshwiller, Fritz Lang, Joseph Ruttenberg and Amy
>Greenfield.
>
>12/7 8:30pm
>
>Before Maya Deren
>
>Restored Milestones
>
>of American
>
>Avant-Garde Cinema
>
>Introduction by Vlada Petric
>
>USA 1920-41 (132 mins)
>
>"The American film avant-garde established itself in the 1920s and 1930s,
>contrary to the standard histories which date its beginning to 1943 with Maya
>Deren." (Jan-Christoph Horak) These films present a backdrop against which one
>can posit the origins of Abstract filmmaking in America.
>
>     Manhatta
>   *  DIRECTED BY Paul Strand & Charles Sheeler (USA, 1920, 6 mins, 16mm, bw,
>     silent);
>
>     Light Rhythms
>   *  Directed by Francis Bruguiere (Great Britain/USA, 1928, 6 mins, 16mm, bw,
>     silent);
>
>     Danse Macabre
>   *  Directed by Dudley Murphy (USA, 1921, 5 mins, 35mm, bw, silent);
>
>     Little Geezer
>   *  Directed by Theodore Huff (USA, 1930, 10 mins, 16mm);
>
>     Footnote to Fact (As I Walk)
>   *  Directed by Lewis Jacobs (USA, 1933, 5 mins, 16mm, bw);
>
>     Mr. Motorboat's Last Stand
>   *  Directed by John Florey (USA, 1933, 10 mins, 16mm, bw);
>
>     Poem 8
>   *  Directed by Emlen Etting (USA, 1935, 15 mins, 16mm, bw);
>
>     La Mer
>   *  Directed by Ovady Julber (USA?, 1936, 16 mins, 16mm, bw);
>
>     Even As You and I
>   *  Directed by Leroy Robins, Roger Barlow, Harry Hay (USA, 1937, 12 mins,
>     16mm, bw);
>
>     Object Lesson
>   *  Directed by Christopher Young (USA, 1941, 12 mins, 16mm, bw);
>
>     Portrait of a Young Man
>   *  Directed by Henwar Rodakiewicz (USA, 1925-31, 35 mins, 16mm, bw, silent)
>
>Fri, 12/8 7:00pm
>
>Mary Ellen Bute & Dwinell Grant
>
>Lecture by Cecile Starr
>
>USA 1934-53 (90 mins)
>
>Mary Ellen Bute (1906-83) and Dwinell Grant (1912-91) worked simultaneously but
>separately in New York City during the early 1940s. Grant worked alone within
>the confines of the art scenes that surrounded Hilla Rebay and Peggy
>Guggenheim. Bute in partnership with Ted Nemeth produced 35mm "seeing sound"
>films visualizing popular music for presentation at Radio City Music Hall.
>
>Directed by Mary Ellen Bute:
>
>Rhythm in Light (USA, 1934, 5 mins, 16mm, bw);
>
>Parabola (USA, 1937, 8.5 mins, 16mm, bw);
>
>Escape (USA, 1937, 4 mins, 16mm, color); Mood Contrasts (USA, 1953, 6.5 mins,
>16mm, color)
>
>Directed by Dwinell Grant: Composition #1: Themis (USA, 1940, 4 mins, 16mm,
>color, silent);
>
>Composition #2: Contrahemis (USA, 1941, 4.5 mins, 16mm, color, silent);
>
>Color Sequence (USA, 1943, 3 mins, 16mm, color, silent);
>
>Three Themes in Variation (USA, 1945, 5.5 mins, 16mm, color, silent)
>
>Fri, 12/8 9:15pm
>
>Oskar Fischinger
>
>& the California School of Color Music
>
>Lecture by William Moritz
>
>USA/Germany 1934-76 (90 mins)
>
>The presence of Oskar Fischinger (1900-67) in Hollywood (where he arrived from
>Germany as a refugee in February 1936) helped inspire a generation of
>California artists, especially through the Art in Cinema programs at the San
>Francisco Museum of Art 1946-49.
>
>Composition in Blue
>*  Directed by Oskar Fischinger (Germany, 1935, 4 mins, 35mm, color);
>
>Allegretto
>*  Directed by Oskar Fischinger (USA, 1936/43, 3 mins, 35mm, color);
>
>Radio Dynamic
>*  Directed by Oskar Fischinger (USA, 1941, 4 mins, 16mm, color, silent);
>
>Film No. 3
>*  Directed by Harry Smith (USA, 1947-49, 3 mins, 16mm, color, silent);
>
>MobiColor Projections
>*  Directed by Charles Dockum (USA, 1961, 5 mins, 16mm, color);
>
>Obmaru
>*  Directed by Patrica Marx (USA, 1953, 4 mins, 16mm, color);
>
>Abstractions 2 & 4
>*  Directed by Denver Sutton (USA, 1956, 3 mins, 16mm, color);
>
>Logos
>*  Directed by Jane Conger (USA, 1957, 2 mins, 16mm)
>
>Sat, 12/9 10:00am
>
>Spirit Stream Storm
>
>35mm Prints of Hand-Crafted Artists' Films
>
>Introduced by Stan Brakhage
>
>USA/Georgia/Spain/France 1967-95 (100 mins)
>
>Besides a generous sampling of Brakhage's hand-painted gems, the program
>features short films by other contemporary masters that question the push-pull
>between abstract and representational imagery in film.
>
>Impressions From the Upper Atmosphere
>*  Directed by Jose Antonio Sistiaga (Spain, 1989, 7 mins, 35mm, color);
>
>Interpolations I-V
>*  Directed by Stan Brakhage (USA, 1992,12 mins, 35mm, color, silent);
>
>Sappho and Jerry:Pts 1-3
>*  Directed by Bruce Posner (USA, 1977-78, 6 mins, 35mm, color);
>
>Giraglia
>*  Directed by Thierry Vincens (France, 1968, 5 mins, 35mm, color);
>
>Orgasamatic
>*  Directed by Bruce Posner (USA, 1984-95, 4 mins, 35mm, color);
>
>Falter
>*  Directed by Kurt Kren (Austria, 1990, 25 secs, 35mm, bw);
>
>Callot
>*  Directed by Charles & Ray Eames (USA, 1974, 3 mins, 35mm, color);
>
>Confession
>*  Directed by Sergei Paradjanov (Georgia, 1990, 8 mins, 35mm, color);
>
>The Dante Quartet
>*  Directed by Stan Brakhage (USA, 1987, 6 mins, 35mm, color, silent);
>
>Garden of Earthly Delights
>*  Directed by Stan Brakhage (USA, 1981, 1.5 mins, 35mm, color, silent);
>
>Hell Spit Flexion
>*  Directed by Stan Brakhage (USA, 1983, 1 min, 35mm, color, silent);
>
>Eye Myth
>*  Directed by Stan Brakhage (USA, 1967, 8 secs, 35mm, color, silent);
>
>Night Music
>*  Directed by Stan Brakhage (USA, 1986, 25 secs, 35mm, color, silent);
>
>Rage Net
>*  Directed by Stan Brakhage (USA, 1988, 25 secs, 35mm, color, silent);
>
>Tausendjahre kino
>*  Directed by Kurt Kren (Austria, 1995, 3 mins, 35mm, color);
>
>The Analects
>*  Directed by Bruce Posner & Amanda Katz (USA, 1987-95, 19 mins, 35mm, color,
>silent)
>
>Sat, 12/9 1:00pm
>
>Four Masters
>
>Grant, McLaren, Lee, Crockwell
>
>USA 1939-49 (60 mins)
>
>A brief but insightful overview of four pioneer abstract filmmakers who made
>films in America throughout the 40s and onward that expanded the language of
>creative filmmaking.
>
>Directed by Dwinell Grant:
>
>Abstract Experiments (USA, 1941-42, 8 mins, 16mm, color, silent);
>
>Composition #3:Spelean Dance (USA, 1942, 2 mins, 16mm, bw, silent);
>
>Composition #5: Fugue (USA, 1949, 8 mins, 16mm, color, silent);
>
>Directed by Norman McLaren:Loops (USA, 1939, 3 mins, 16mm, color);
>
>Pen Point Percussion
>
>National Film Board of Canada (Canada, 1949?, 6 mins, 16mm, bw)
>
>Directed by Francis Lee: Le Bijou (USA, 1943, 7 mins, 16mm, color);
>
>Idyll (USA, 1947, 9 mins, 16mm, color)
>
>Directed by Douglass Crockwell: Glens Falls Sequence (USA, 1946, 8 mins, 16mm,
>color, silent);
>
>The Long Bodies (USA, 1947, 4 mins, 16mm, color, silent)
>
>Sat, 12/9 2:00pm
>
>Can Language Describe Abstract Film?
>
>Panel Discussion with Films
>
>USA 1937-81 (60 mins)
>
>Optical Poem
>*  Directed by OsKar Fischinger (USA, 1937, 6 mins, 35mm, color);
>
>Color Rhapsodie
>*  Directed by Mary Ellen Bute (USA, 1948, 6 mins, 35mm, color);
>
>Garden of Earthly Delights
>*  Directed by Stan Brakhage (USA, 1981, 1.5 mins, 35mm, color, silent)
>
>Sat, 12/9 3:00pm
>
>Mary Ellen Bute
>
>USA 1934-53 (60 mins)
>
>In the mid 1930s, Mary Ellen Bute was the first American to make abstract
>motion pictures, and in the early 1950s the first person in the world to use
>electronic imagery in a film. She studied with experimental music pioneers
>Joseph Schillinger and Leon Theremin. Bute's introduction to Ted Nemeth led to
>a partnership (and marriage in 1940) that produced 12 short musical abstract
>films.
>
>DIRECTED BY MARY ELLEN BUTE: Dada (Universal Clip) (USA, 1936, 3 mins, 16mm,
>bw);
>
>Tarantella (USA, 1940, 4 mins, 16mm, color);
>
>RCA: New Sensations in Sound (USA, 1959, 3 mins, 35mm, color);
>
>Synchromy No. 2 (USA, 1935, 5 mins, 16mm, bw);
>
>Spook Sport (USA, 1939, 8 mins, 35mm, color);
>
>Imagination (USA, 1958, 2 mins, 16mm, color);
>
>Pastoral (USA, 1950, 6 mins, 16mm, color);
>
>Polka Graph (USA, 1947, 4 mins, 35mm, color);
>
>Abstronic (USA, 1952, 5.5 mins, 35mm, color)
>
>Sat, 12/9 4:00pm
>
>Len Lye
>
>Great Britain/USA/New Zealand 1929-80 (90 mins)
>
>Len Lye (1901-80) produced "compositions of motion" during the 30s in Great
>Britain and later in America. He was a pioneer practitioner of "direct" film
>techniques whereby images are directly placed onto or scratched into celuloid
>without the aid of a camera.
>
>DIRECTED BY LEN LYE: Tusalava (Great Britain, 1929, 9 mins, 16mm, bw, silent);
>
>Kaleidoscope (Great Britain, 1935, 4 mins, 16mm, color);
>
>A Colour Box (Great Britain, 1935, 3 mins, 16mm, color);
>
>The Birth of the Robot (Great Britain, 1936, 7 mins, 16mm, color);
>
>Rainbow Dance (Great Britain, 1936, 5 mins, 16mm, color);
>
>Swinging the Lambeth Walk (Great Britain, 1939, 4 mins, 16mm, color);
>
>Musical Poster No. 1 (Great Britain, 1940, 3 mins, 16mm, color);
>
>Color Cry (USA, 1952, 3 mins, 16mm, color);
>
>Rhythm (USA, 1957, 1 min, 16mm, bw);
>
>Free Radicals (USA, 1979, 4 mins, 16mm, bw);
>
>Tal Farlow (New Zealand, 1980, 2 mins, 16mm, bw);
>
>Trade Tattoo (Great Britain, 1937, 6 mins, 16mm, color);
>
>Colour Flight (Great Britain, 1938, 4 mins, 16mm, color);
>
>Particles in Space (USA, 1979, 4 mins, 16mm, bw);
>
>Sat, 12/9 7:00pm
>
>James Whitney
>
>Lecture by William Moritz
>
>USA 1941-82 (90 mins)
>
>James Whitney (1921-81) began collaborating on abstract films with his older
>brother John (192?-95) (see Sunday at 3:00pm) in the early 40s. James became
>increasingly involved in contemplative, spiritual interests-Jungian psychology,
>alchemy, yoga, Tao, Krishnamurti and consciousness expansion-which became the
>subject matter of the films on which he labored for over 30 years. Directed by
>James Whitney: Variations on a Circle (USA, 1941-42, 9 mins, 16mm, color);
>
>Yantra (USA, 1950-57, 8 mins, 16mm, color);
>
>High Voltage (USA, 1957, 3 mins, 16mm, color);
>
>Lapis (USA, 1963-66, 10 mins, 16mm, color);
>
>Wu Ming (USA, 1977, 17 mins, 16mm, color, silent);
>
>Kang Jing Xiang (USA, 1982, 13 mins, 16mm, color, silent)
>
>Sat, 12/9 9:15pm
>
>James Davis & Hy Hirsh
>
>Lecture by Robert Haller
>
>USA 1949-66 (90 mins)
>
>James Davis (1901-74) and Hy Hirsh (1911-61) constructed kaleidoscopically
>beautiful films that had no parallels or precedents in the arts. Whether Hirsh
>was rapidly editing images made on an optical printer, or Davis descending into
>the planes of light created by his illuminated plastics, both men made films
>which existed outside of tradition, but anticipated films made decades later.
>
>Directed by Hy Hirsh: D fense d'afficher (USA, 1958-59, 8 mins, 16mm, color);
>
>Scratch Pad (USA, 1959, 7 mins, 16mm, color);
>
>Chasse des Touches (USA, 1959, 4 mins, 16mm, color)
>
>Directed by James Davis: Impulses (Processes) (USA, 1959, 9 mins, 16mm, color);
>
>Jersey Falls (USA, 1949, 7 mins, 16mm, color);
>
>Death & Transfiguration (USA, 1961, 9.5 mins, 16mm, color)
>
>Sun, 12/10 10:00am
>
>Analytical Abstractions Beyond the Screen
>
>Introduced by Gerald O'Grady France, Germany, USA 1923-76 (90 mins)
>
>European influences on the American abstract film came from multiple sources.
>One such thread follows images that have been abstracted to the point of
>appearing to step off the screen.
>
>Ballet M canique
>*  Directed by Ferdand L ger, Dudley Murphy, Man Ray (France, 1924, 19 mins,
>16mm, bw, with restored sound track);
>
>Return to Reason
>*  Directed by Man Ray (France, 1923, 3 mins, 16mm, bw, silent);
>
>Recreation
>*  Directed by Robert Breer (USA, 1957, 1.5 mins, 16mm, color);
>
>H2O
>*  Directed by Ralph Steiner (USA, 1929, 11 mins, 16mm, bw, silent);
>
>Rhythm 21
>*  Directed by Hans Richter (Germany, 1924, 5 mins, 16mm, bw, silent);
>
>Light-Play in Black, White, Gray
>*  Directed by Laszlo Moholy-Nagy (Germany, 1926, 6 mins, 16mm, bw, silent);
>
>Dream Displacement
>*  Directed by Paul Sharits (USA, 1976, 25 mins, 16mm, color)
>
>Sun, 12/10 1:00pm
>
>Hy Hirsh
>
>USA 1952-61 (60 mins)
>
>Hirsh's films developed a masterful mix of sound and image via oscillascope
>electronics and optical printing synchronized to his home-made recordings of
>jazz and Afro-Caribbean music. He was an influential figure of the West Coast
>film scene and manifested himself in front of, and behind, the camera for films
>by Sidney Peterson, Harry Smith, Jordan Belson and others.
>
>Directed by Hy Hirsh: Gyromorphosis (USA, 1957, 7 mins, 16mm, color);
>
>Come Closer (USA, 1952, 7 mins, 16mm, color);
>
>D fense d'afficher (USA, 1958-59, 8 mins, 16mm, color);
>
>Scratch Pad (USA, 1959, 7 mins, 16mm, color);
>
>Autumn Spectrum (USA, 1957, 7 mins, 16mm, color);
>
>Chasse des Touches (USA, 1959, 4 mins, 16mm, color);
>
>La Couleur de la forme (USA, 1961, 7 mins, 16mm, color);
>
>Eneri (USA, 1953, 7 mins, 16mm, color)
>
>Sun, 12/10 2:00pm
>
>Hilla Rebay & the Guggenheim Nexus
>
>Panel Discussion with Films USA 1937-51 (60 mins)
>
>An American March
>*  Directed by Oskar Fischinger (USA, 1941, 3 mins, 35mm, color);
>
>Stars and Stripes
>*  Directed by Norman McLaren (USA, 1943, 4 mins, 16mm, color);
>
>Film No. 7
>*  Directed by Harry Smith (USA, 1951, 7 mins, 16mm, color, silent);
>
>Sun, 12/10 3:00pm
>
>James & John Whitney's Early Works
>
>USA 1939-52 (60 mins)
>
>Their series of FILM EXERCISES, produced between 1943-44, are visually based on
>modernist composition theory with varied permutation of forms. The eerie glow
>of these forms is paralleled by a pioneer music sound score composed using an
>elaborate pendulum device they invented to write out sounds directly onto the
>film's soundtrack.
>
>24 Variations on a Theme
>*  Directed by James & John Whitney (USA, 1939-40, 5 mins, 8mm on video, color,
>silent);
>
>3 Untitled Films
>*  Directed by James & John Whitney (USA, 1940-42, 15 mins, 8mm on video,
>color, silent);
>
>Film Exercise No. 1
>*  Directed by John Whitney (USA, 1943, 5 mins, 16mm, color);
>
>Film Exercises No. 2 & 3
>*  Directed by James Whitney (USA, 1943-44, 3 mins, 16mm, color);
>
>Film Exercises No. 4
>*  Directed by James Whitney (USA, 1944, 8 mins, 16mm, color);
>
>Film Exercises No. 5
>*  Directed by John Whitney (USA, 1944, 5 mins, 16mm, color);
>
>Hot House
>*  Directed by John Whitney (USA, 1949, 3 mins, 16mm, color);
>
>Mozart Rondo
>*  Directed by John Whitney (USA, 1949, 3 mins, 16mm, color);
>
>Celery Stalks at Midnight
>*  Directed by John Whitney (USA, 1952, 3 mins, 16mm, color)
>
>Sun, 12/10 4:00pm
>
>James Davis
>
>USA 1948-64 (90 mins)
>
>Davis started making films in 1946 and continued until his death (completing
>113 films) to photograph his curved plastic sculpture, mobile-like structures
>that would hang in space, rotate and reflect/refract light into shifting pools
>and points of color. Abstract and mysterious to many spectators, these waves
>and streams of light were for Davis images of "the causative force of nature."
>
>Directed by James Davis: Light Reflections (USA, 1948, 14 mins, 16mm, color);
>
>The Sea (USA, 1950, 8.5 mins, 16mm, color);
>
>Analogies #1 (USA, 1953, 9.5 mins, 16mm, color);
>
>Taliesin-West (USA, 1950, 9.5 mins, 16mm, color);
>
>Evolution (USA, 1955, 8 mins, 16mm, color);
>
>Taliesin-East (USA, 1950, 9.5 mins, 16mm, color);
>
>Energies (USA, 1957, 9.5 mins, 16mm, color);
>
>Like a Breeze (USA, 1954, 8.5 mins, 16mm, color);
>
>Fathomless (USA, 1964, 11 mins, 16mm, color)
>
>Sun, 12/10 7:00pm
>
>James Sibley Watson, Jr. & Melville Webber
>
>Lecture by Robert Haller USA 1928-30 (90 mins)
>
>Watson (1894-1982) and Webber (1895-1947) worked from literary sources-Poe, the
>Bible-but so transmuted them that their films THE FALL OF THE HOUSE OF USHER
>and LOT IN SODOM stand as extraordinary visual cinema. In USHER letters and
>words rise up out of the dark-forming messages we can not hear but can see and
>grasp far more vividly. In Lot in Sodom the world is seen through prismatic
>curtains of light and darkness, curtains over the windows of dreams and
>imagination, if not the soul.
>
>Directed by James Sibley Watson, Jr. & Melville Webber: Fall of the House of
>Usher (USA, 1928, 15 mins, 16mm, bw);
>
>Lot in Sodom (USA, 1930, 30 mins, 35mm, bw)
>
>Sun, 12/10 9:15pm
>
>Hands On Filmmaking
>
>Lecture by Stan Brakhage Germany/USA 1921-79 (90 mins)
>
>Stan Brakhage will address the hand-made aspect of filmmaking by focusing on
>films and filmmakers who greatly influence his current working process - namely
>the frame-by-frame construction of images along the film strip.
>
>     Symphonie Diagonale
>   *  Directed by Viking Eggeling (Germany, 1924-25, 6 mins, 16mm, bw, silent);
>
>     Light-Play, Opus No. I
>   *  Directed by Walther Ruttmann (Germany, 1921, 13 mins, 16mm, color tints,
>     sound);
>
>     Particles in Space
>   *  Directed by Len Lye (USA, 1979, 4 mins, 16mm, bw);
>
>     Film No. 1, 2, 3
>   *  Directed by Harry Smith (USA, 1946-49, 8 mins, 16mm, color);
>
>     Motion Painting No. 1
>   *  Directed by Oskar Fischinger (USA, 1947, 11 mins, 16mm, color)
>
>Hand-Painted Trilogy
>
>No Charge
>
>with Lectures
>
>Between lectures on Friday, Saturday and Sunday the latest hand-painted opus by
>Stan Brakhage will be screened in 3 parts. The complete trilogy will be shown
>on Monday at 9:30pm.
>
>     Fri, 12/8 8:30pm
>
>     I Take These Truths
>   *  Directed by Stan Brakhage (USA, 1995, 35 mins, 16mm, color, silent)
>
>     Sat, 12/9 8:30pm
>
>     We Hold These
>   *  Directed by Stan Brakhage (USA, 1995, 20 mins, 16mm, color, silent)
>
>     Sun, 12/10 8:30pm
>
>     I...
>   *  Directed by Stan Brakhage (USA, 1995, 30 mins, 16mm, color, silent)
>
>     Mon, 12/11 9:30pm
>
>     Hand-Painted Trilogy (complete)
>   *  Directed by Stan Brakhage (USA, 1995, 85 mins, 16mm, color, silent)
>
>Normal admissions apply
>
>--PART-BOUNDARY=.19511161504.ZM25815.zkm.de--
>
>
Maureen Furniss, Ph.D.
Editor, Animation Journal and Assistant Professor
Chapman University, 333 N. Glassell, Orange, CA 92666 USA
Tel: 714-744-7018; Fax: 714-996-6700
E-mail: [log in to unmask]
Animation Journal home page: http://www.chapman.edu/animation
 
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