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>
>The question itself, though, raises the more problematic question of
what
>constitutes the film "
>narrator" in the first place.  Is it the implied organizing and
presenting
>consciousness?  Is it an anthropomorphization of the "camera" (which
usualy
>also means editing and sound)?  Is it the apparent focus of the main
character?
>Is it to be confined to the much rarer instance of a first-person
voiceover
>narrator?
 
 
******  Actually i'd used the phrase "film *equivalent* of unreliable
narrator" partly to avoid this question.  There really isn't a narrator
in film in the sense that a novel has a narrator; even film voiceovers
are the source of the images as a written narrator is the source of all
our information.  (With exceptions like, oh, John Fowles' The Collector
which alternates two different first-person narrations.)  A film like
Lady in the Lake might be unique in narrative film for feature-length
first-person.  LT
 
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