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>Off the track of this thread, but I'm curious. We recently had a friend over
>from England, and while flipping channels, we came across "A Clockwork
>Orange". She said she read the book, but that the film was banned in England.
>I was dumbfounded, but...?
>
>Anyone have any insight into this?
>
>Mike
 
Mike
Yes Clockwork Orange is banned in the UK - not only England.  Having just
come from there to New Zealand I was surprised that here you can hire the
film from video stores - I had never been able to get hold of it before.
It's banned,
I think this is right, under the category of being termed a *video nasty*.
But it
seems that this was not always the case as I remember my parents going to
view  it
at the cinema when it was originally released.
 
The discussion of violent films has been an interesting one having done
reception research on The Accused.  Whilst we might view this as containing
the message that
no woman provokes rape, the message taken from the film by many  women
viewers is
that women should not display their sexuality to the extent that it might
be interpreted by men as 'a come on'.  How do members of the Screen-L
group rate this film in relation to
the question 'are violent movies good'?.  It seems to me that most of the
debate so far is coming from an auteur approach.  But what about the
position of the industry context of films?
 
C. Kay Weaver
Department of Film and Television Studies,
University of Waikato
Hamilton, New Zealand.
 
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