Print

Print


----------------------------Original message----------------------------
At  3:53 PM 4/5/95 -0500, Donald Larsson wrote:
>----------------------------Original message----------------------------
>
>Kristine Butler writes:
>"I'd like to elicit a mass brainstorming effort:  I'm working on an idea
>concerning films in which a pre-recorded message plays a part in conveying
>narrative information (an answering machine, a tape player, etc.).
>Example:  in Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown, Pepa's boyfriend
>exists primarily as the messages he leaves on her answering machine.
>Anything you can think of would be greatly appreciated.  More on this
>later.  Thanks!!"
>
>Do you mean only *electronically* pre-recorded messages?  There are many, many
> examples of *print* messages having a role in the narrative.
>
>Two electronic sources that come to mind are the original film verison of DEATH
> OF
>A SALESMAN, which includes a wire recorder, and the giant on-the-wall
> reel-to-reel answering maching in Mike Hammer's apartment in KISS ME DEADLY.
>
>Don Larsson, Mankato State U. (MN)
 
 
First of all, I'd like to thank everyone who has been submitting ideas to
this effort.  Just to let you know, I will be keeping in touch on the uses
I make of this information.  At the moment I'm only information-gathering,
but my primary work on this will be in the summer and the fall.  At
sometime in the nearish future, I'll send a copy of my prospectus to
SCREEN-L.
 
In response to Don Larsson's question, yes, I do only mean electronically
pre-recorded messages, as I am looking primarily at sound recordings.
 
Kris Butler
University of Minnesota
[log in to unmask]