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----------------------------Original message----------------------------
I hope David Desser doesn't mind me spinning off a related issue from his
initial post about the quality of movies vis a vis TV.  I've been noticing
for awhile now, in my opinion, that comedy is much better on TV than at the
movies.  It seems like I get many more laughs in a good half hour of The
Simpsons, or Seinfeld, or Fraiser, or Roseanne, than in an hour and a half
of any movie I've seen in the past three years.
 
Is this because (1) It's easier to sustain comedy in a half hour format
than in a longer format?; (2) Because characters are already established in
a half hour series format its easier to use these characters and their
relationships for humor?; (3) Given the plot driven/action orientation of
films these days, writing has been devalued in films over the last 20
years, and because TV is more of a conversational medium it has
concentrated on dialogue more than film has, thus attracting better comedy
writers?; (4) My expectations for film comedy are higher than TV because I
have to shell out $6 for the films, or $2 for the video?; (5) I'm totally
wrong so why don't I just shut up?; or (6) Some other reason???
 
Thanks for listening (reading?)!
 
>----------------------------Original message----------------------------
>Been noticing lately how little motivated I am to go out to the movies.
>Dragged myself to see BAD COMPANY and was sorry I did so.  Has anyone
>noticed besides me how, lately at least, there is much more of interest on
>television, from CBS' Monday night lineup, to NBC's Thursday night line-up,
>to HOMICIDE?  And has anyone else come to the conclusion that A&E deserves
>a world of credit for brining us CRACKER with the awesome Robbie Coltrane.
>Or has Hollywood demographics based me by now that I'm on the other side of
>40?
>
>DD
>
>_____________________________________
>David Desser,UIUC Cinema Studies
>2109 FLB/707 S. Mathews, Urbana, IL  61801
>217/244-2705
 
 
Matt McAllister
Department of Communication Studies, Virginia Tech
Blacksburg, VA  24061-0311  e-mail: [log in to unmask]  ph: 703-231-9830