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----------------------------Original message----------------------------
 
 
I remember seeing the movie at a drive-in theatre in West Los
Angeles, California, sometime around April, 1964. After more
than 30 years, thger there is one scene that still sticks in
my mind: there is a dirt road somewhere in the French country-
side. On either side are rows of trees. At one end is an elderly
French couple; at the other end arr two American G.I.s. Each
set thinks the others are the murderers (German soldiers/Nazis)
because they are twoxxx too far away to really tell. Anyway,
slowly but surely, each set gets closer and closer until they
realize that the other set is not German.
 
Finally, the elderly couple fall at the feet of the American
soldiers and kiss their hands. I was only 20 when I saw the
movie, but this was one of the turning points in my life. This
scene distilled for me the reaoxxx reason why World War II was
fought: to fight against those who sought to destroy us and the
civilization and culture that had been made up to that point.
 
How sad that many people, such as the elderly French couple had
been caught up within the maelstrom; even more unfortunate are
the others that didn't survive to see any American/Allied \
soldiers.
 
Yes, the film did seem to paint a picture about the futility
of war. Now I know why I haven't seen it in all these years.
Maybe one day we'll all get lucky as we did with "Animal
Crackers" from Paramount (1930).
 
Keith A. Reinsdorf
 
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