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>> On Tuesday, Nov. 22, P. Feng said:
>>
>> > (3) And certainly the portrait of Pilipina women was not politically
>> >     correct under any definition.
>>
>> Bravo!  I was hoping someone would bring this point up.  I was sitting
>> here, biting my tongue because of my recent unpopular stance on Quentin
>> Tarantino's use of racist language.
>>
>> I, too, found that particular sequence to be tasteless -- and needlessly
>> so, just like Tarantino & PF.  It marred an otherwise wonderful film.  It
>> is particularly hard to understand in this case because *Priscilla* was
>> otherwise so understanding in its depiction of people who live outside the
>> established "norms" of contemporary society.
>>
>> Christopher White
>>
>
>Yes, I agree with both P. Feng and Christopher White, that the
>representation of Pilipina women was rather stereotypically incorrect.
>(Note: I am not talking "PC" here.) I hate to generalise here, but in
 
Was that character actually an example of a stereotypical Pilipina woman?
I'm in the U.S. and I'm not aware of *any* Pilipina stereotype unless they
were lumped into an Asian woman stereotype of demure and subserviant (two
things that that particular character was not). Perhaps because of the
greater proximity, there is such a stereotype of Pilipina sex workers.
What is it that people find offensive about the character? Is it her
"performance" in the bar? I saw it as an humorously surprising way to get
the attention she craved, by doing what she knew how to do? Is it her
hen-pecking ways? I see it as a common, non-ethnicly specific stereotype
particularly attached to trailer-dwellers.
I am genuinely curious about why this character bother people.
 
Curtis
 
 
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