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re: Donna Harrington's post that if victor is taking on the role of
the gods/God whether or not he is delighted with his creation's
abilities is not even possibly a main sub-point...
It has been my experience that many a philosopher/artist/backdoor scholar
has written/talked/wondered about the gods feelings towards human
accomplishment.  Pride and disgust in your creation is an unavoidable
issue.  Regardless of victor's position as a "god", he is nevertheless
a human being (a primary issue of the story as I see it, whether or
not a human can usurp the role of creation traditionally reserved
for a divine being) and must grapple with his actions and their result
on a physical, emotional, and philosophical level, which I feel would
elicit at least a brief, and probably guiltily realized, sense of
pride that what he had so desparetly hoped and dreamed after was
becoming closer to his original vision than he expected.  He claims
to be mad, to have a madness, when he meets the ship captain... a madness
for discovery.  I didn't see that in Branagh's performance.
 
denis