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Hennely[?] wrote:
 <<as to Lauren's statement that Marcellus is shamed because of
 homophobia, I would bring up the psychological tendency
 of shame, however unjustified, that accompanies rape and other
 acts against one's person, especially of a sexual nature.
 Furthermore, there seems to be an implication by several posts
 on this group that "homophobic" statements or reactions by
 a film's characters make the film/filmmaker homophobic as well.
 This seems to me to be a very shortsighted consideration of
 art.  I know this is a long standing argument among theorists
d bring it up again here
 lest we lose sight of our assumptions.>>
 
I just want to say that in my remarks about
the film's alleged homophobia, I was referring to
the film's FIGURATION of homophobia--its ironization,
if you'll forgive the term--not
its enuciative homophobia (tho I think a case
can be made for the latter as well...along with
its "ironized" sexism, racism [there utterly modsquad
romanticized in spots--T's/Jimmy's wife
is a black nurse..]).
I never said that Marcellus is shamed; I just
asked another poster why he thought shame
the self-evident reason for exiling willis, er butch.
why should male rape be a cause for shame unless homphopbia or
simple homohatred is operating?  In asking this,
I do not attribute the shaming/homophobia
to T, but to a viewer who assumes the self-evidence
of the relation between shame and malerape.  That
viewer misses the irony--which irony is, in a final
irony, itself a arguably homophobic.
Sorry this is so picky.  I hope it clarifies.
Someone a few posts back said it best about the
gangstarapping of citational irony.