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. . .  much deleted . . .
 
> I, too, have noticed an increase in the crankiness and intolerance
> factors here on SCREEN-L.  I hope it's just a phase SCREEN-L is
> suffering through and not an indication of what's going to happen as
> lanes are added to the Infobahn.
>
>
> | Jeremy G. Butler - - - - - - - - - - | Internet : [log in to unmask] |
> | SCREEN-L Coordinator                 | BITNET   :        JBUTLER@UA1VM |
> |                                                                        |
> | Telecommunication & Film Dept * The University of Alabama * Tuscaloosa |
 
It seems to me that the crankiness and intolerance on Screen-L -- which have,
indeed, increased lately -- aren't the result of new members, on-ramps to
the superhighway, or any other outside influence, nor do they seem that
difficult to eliminate, presuming that folks *want* to eliminate them.
I hate to sound like my own grandmother (well, no I don't), but it seems
to me that commonsense manners are the key, even (or perhaps especially)
in this new age of electronic discussion groups.
 
This means that I should not presume that the person to whose
message I am responding is a raving idiot, despite the fact that I
may completely disagree with what he or she said in his or her message.
Chances are, I don't actually know the poster personally,
so rather than challenge the poster personally (not only with what I say
but how I say it), I ought to direct my attention to his or her argument.
Period.  If I find something offensive, I can indicate that in ways that
stop short of personal attack or insult.  This doesn't mean that debate
can't (or shouldn't be) lively, passionate, heated, heartfelt . . . merely
that it should stop short of rudeness.
 
Other lists manage it . . . so can this one.
 
Alison McKee
Department of Film and Television
UCLA
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