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                      E L E C T R O N I C   M E S S A G E
 
                                        Date:     18-May-1994 08:08am EST
                                        From:     Stephen Hart
                                                  HARTS2
                                        Level:    Post-secondary/University
                                        Tel No:   904-644-4839
 
TO:  Remote Addressee                     ( _jnet%screen-l@ua1vm )
 
 
Subject: re: Crooklyn
 
 
 
                      E L E C T R O N I C   M E S S A G E
 
                                        Date:     18-May-1994 07:49am EST
                                        From:     Stephen Hart
                                                  HARTS2
                                        Level:    Post-secondary/University
                                        Tel No:   904-644-4839
 
TO:  Remote Addressee                     ( _jnet%filmus-l@iubvm )
 
 
Subject: re: Crooklyn
 
Lee lectured here about two months ago.  At a QandA session, he was asked
about that dolly shot, which the inquirer called the "Spike Lee walk".  Lee
said that it was first used in _Jungle Fever_, and was experimental at the
time.  (Upon first seeing it, I liked the idea.  I only wished that the
walking looked more natural).  The "walk" found its effective use in
_Malcolm X_, where Malcolm, contemplating his demise while en route to the
Audubon Ballroom, kind of floats along in a dream-like state.  Was it's use
in _Crooklyn_ suggestive of a dreamlike state?
About the mike stands, etc.  How often did they appear during the film?
Once or twice may be excusable:  I notice technical flaws like that in
films from time to time.  But more than that would be sloppy.  And were
they just barely out of frame or were they like in plain view?  One poster
didn't notice them at all, which made me think that they may not be so
noticable at some theaters, depending on projection.  Case in point is when
I saw _Breaking Away_ years ago, and noticed the boom mike at the top of
the screen in one scene.  When on TV a few years later, the mike was gone!
 
Stephen Hart, Florida State Univ.
HARTS2@firnvx