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Robert,
 
I do agree that self-promotion of Eisenstein and Vertov with little help
of Western Leftists made them what they are today in film histories.  I
would like to see however Dovzhenko's self-promotion.  I am in a process
of compiling Dovzhenko's bibliography and there is no self-serving
theorizing in any of his writings.  Be careful when you try to generalize.
 
Why has  the  term "feminist" got stuck to *Tretia Meshchanskaia* also
known as *Bed and Sofa*? One has to see the film in its historical
context of NEP and other changes the society was going thru in order to
understand it.  The title means "Number Three Petit-Bourgeois Street".
The film was intended as a critique of the new bourgeoise in the Soviet
society of the 1920s.  A woman who does nothing (she does not work or do
much at home), has an affair and leaves both pathetic men out of boredom to
search for ... another man she could use?.  Remember that in 1920s (and
today) women could  not get anywhere in Russian society unless they use men
wisely.  So the heroine of *Bed and Sofa* can go back to her parents or
to find another man (remember there is a housing shortage in Moscow)
the second alternative seems to be a solution in this case.
 
Why is Bed and Sofa overlooked?.  It has been used in North America for
many years in courses on Soviet cinema as alternative to the
"Revolutionary cinema"?
 
Just my 2 cents Canadian (1,4 cent in US funds).
 
Bohdan Y. Nebesio, University of Alberta