Print

Print


The journal is proud to announce the publication of issue 26.10. We are
excited to have contributions from members of our own editorial team: Maria
Skouras, Laura Springman, Kathy Cacace, Hazem Fahmy, Jackson Wright, and
Laura Brown. Please see below for more details about the authors'
respective columns:

Maria Skouras, "Preserving Tourism Imaginaries: Vacationers Urged to Visit
Online Now, Travel IRL Later"
<http://www.flowjournal.org/2020/08/preserving-tourism-imaginaries/>

Maria Skouras explores how national tourism boards are fostering the
"tourism imaginaries" of potential visitors while encouraging them to stay
home during the COVID-19 crisis.


Laura Springman, "'It's ARMY versus the U.S. Army.': K-Pop Fans, Activism,
and #BlackLivesMatter"
<http://www.flowjournal.org/2020/08/its-army-versus-the-army/>

Laura Springman explores the recent example of K-pop fan involvement in the
Black Lives Matter movement on Twitter as a continuation of a tradition of
K-pop fan activism.


Kathy Cacace, "'Stop Treating the Protests Like Coachella': On the Uses of
Sousveillance for Social Justice"
<http://www.flowjournal.org/2020/08/sousveillance-for-social-justice/>

Kathy Cacace considers the limitations and possibilities of sousveillance
to interrupt white supremacy, drawing examples from the Black Lives Matter
uprising during the summer of 2020.


Hazem Fahmy, "Streaming Egypt: Netflix & the Transnational Flow of Egyptian
Media" <http://www.flowjournal.org/2020/08/streaming-egypt/>

Hazem Fahmy analyzes Netflix's recent acquisition of Egyptian films,
television series, and plays.


Jackson Wright, "White Complexity, White Complicity, and New Stereotype in
*Booksmart*" <http://www.flowjournal.org/2020/08/booksmart-whitecomplexity/>

Jackson Wright investigates the 2019 film *Booksmart*, complicating its
popular reception as a progressive piece of media, instead positing that
the film continues to marginalize nonwhite characters and support white
superiority.


Laura Brown, "'Maybe You Don't Know How to Listen...': An Exercise in
Contextualization"
<http://www.flowjournal.org/2020/08/maybe-you-dont-know-how-to-listen/>

Laura Brown unpacks a 1946 WCBS radio advertisement, and considers the
multiple uses of archival materials.


*Flow* <http://flowjournal.org/> is a critical forum on television and
media culture published by the Department of Radio-Television-Film
<https://rtf.utexas.edu/> at the University of Texas at Austin. *Flow*'s
mission is to provide a space where scholars and the public can discuss
media histories, media studies, and the changing landscape of contemporary
media.

----
Learn to speak like a film/TV professor! Listen to the ScreenLex
podcast:
http://screenlex.org