Print

Print


Final Weeks!!

The final deadline for submissions to all areas of Film & History's upcoming conference, in partnership with the Literature/Film Association, is September 15, 2010.

Please scroll down for calls for papers for: Dangerous, Transgressive, and Unloved: The View from Way Outside; Lovers on the Side: Tramps and Rogues in Film and History; Vampire Love; The Dark Side of Love: Love, Sex and Violence in Film and Video.

***
Call for Papers

“Dangerous, Transgressive, and Unloved: The View from Way Outside”
2010 Film & History Conference: Representations of Love in Film and Television
November 11-14, 2010
Hyatt Regency Milwaukee
www.uwosh.edu/filmandhistory

AREA:  Dangerous, Transgressive, and Unloved:  The View from Way Outside: 

This area invites papers that explore films and filmmakers offering dangerously alternative “points-of-view” to our dominant film and video culture. Rejected and distinctly *un-loved,* these views are deemed not simply subversive, but criminally dangerous to the central values of American Culture. Papers should examine the methods and meanings provoked by films and filmmakers representing such radical cinematic “points-of-view.”   

The area is not limited to the traditional medium of film, but is open to similar examples in television, video, and new media.

Possibilities include, but are not limited to such topics as:

• Film and/or media works exploring or made by media makers from despised
  communities (i.e., drug addicts, prison populations, sex-workers, 
  pedophiles, and practitioners of S & M, bondage, incest, etc.) 

  Possible films: Hard Candy; An Education; Born Into Brothels; 9 ½ Weeks; 
  My Lover, My Son: The Hamiltons; La Petit Lili; Trainspotting.
 
• The work of historically subversive media makers such as:  Jack Smith,
  Kenneth Anger, (Early) John Walters, Kathy Acker, Lizzie Borden, and 
  other film and media makers who challenged the line between art, the 
  offensive, and the pornographic.

• Dangerous and transgressive media that extends beyond the personal, to 
  include politically dangerous media, such as the use of offensive film or 
  videos as political discourse. 

• Any and all papers that examine the various intersections of film and media 
  art and dangerous, transgressive topics in contemporary culture will be 
  considered.  

If we should NOT be talking about your paper topic, this is the area where we can talk about it.  


Please send your 200-word proposal by e-mail to the area chair:

G. Tom Poe, Ph.D.
The Department of Communication Studies
The University of Missouri-Kansas City
202 Haag Hall
5100 Rockhill Road
Kansas City, Missouri, 64110

Email:  [log in to unmask]
Tele:  816-235-1691
Fax: 816-235-5539

Panel proposals for up to four presenters are also welcome, but each presenter must submit his or her own paper proposal. For updates and registration information about the upcoming meeting, see the Film & History website (www.uwosh.edu/filmandhistory).

***

Call for Papers
“Lovers on the Side: Tramps and Rogues in Film and History”
2010 Film & History Conference: Representations of Love in Film and Television
November 11-14, 2010
Hyatt Regency Milwaukee
www.uwosh.edu/filmandhistory

AREA: Lovers on the Side: Tramps and Rogues in Film and History

Temptresses and libertines, sirens and scoundrels, shady ladies and gigolos—these cinematic figures of stolen or corrupted passion have complicated, reinforced, deepened—or challenged, derailed, and redefined—our understanding of “love.” What are the limits of love? When and why does it become wrong? What genres or historical periods of film and television have dominated our perception of those sometimes dangerous, often essential figures on the margins of love? And how has their service to morality and ethics changed over time, as these figures embody the thrills, heartbreaks, and consequences of illicit passion?

This area, comprising multiple panels, welcomes papers and panel proposals that examine all forms and genres of films featuring the tramps and rogues who test the nature and boundaries of love.  Possibilities include, but are not limited to, the following topics:

• Complicated combinations (Gone with the Wind; The Photographer, His Wife, Her Lover; Diary of a Seducer; Vicky Cristina Barcelona)

• Soiled Doves (McCabe and Mrs. Miller, The Outlaw)

• The Tart with a Heart (Charity Hope Valentine in Sweet Charity;  Satine in Moulin Rouge; Sera in Leaving Las Vegas)

• Men and Women of Mystery (Arthur Tracy,  Lynn Bari)

• Noir Lovers (Scarlet Street, The Big Sleep)

• Just a Gigolo  (Don Juan, Affairs of Anatol)

• Affairs of Office (The Apartment, An American Affair, The Special Relationship)

Please send your 200-word proposal by e-mail to the area chair:

Cynthia J. Miller, Area Chair
Emerson College
Institute for Liberal Arts and Interdisciplinary Studies
120 Boylston St.
Boston, MA  02116
Email: [log in to unmask] (email submissions preferred)

Panel proposals for up to four presenters are also welcome, but each presenter must submit his or her own paper proposal. For updates and registration information about the upcoming meeting, see the Film & History website (www.uwosh.edu/filmandhistory).

***

Call for Papers
“Vampire Love”
2010 Film & History Conference: Representations of Love in Film and Television
November 11-14, 2010
Hyatt Regency Milwaukee
www.uwosh.edu/filmandhistory

AREA: Vampire Love.

The history of film is regularly punctuated by vampiric manifestations. From the earliest surviving film, 1922’s Nosferatu, Eine Symphonie des Grauens, to the currently popular Twilight saga, cinematic vampires, by virtue perhaps of nothing more than the physical intimacy of their feeding habits and the exchange of bodily fluids, have been viewed as sexual creatures. Or is there more to it? Does the nature of this sexualization change over time? Does Max Schreck’s Nosferatu devise a complex metaphor for venereal disease? Does Bela Lugosi represent American fears about “decadent” European sexuality or Western fears about sexually predacious male behavior? How might vampirism in 1936’s Dracula’s Daughter be viewed as an expression of lesbian desire? Do the Hammer Studios Dracula films of Christopher Lee reflect cultural anxieties about juvenile sexuality? Are the lesbian vampire films of the 1970s a symbol of homosexual liberation or an expression of male anxieties about uncontrolled female sexuality? Does the post-millennial increase in sympathetic depictions of vampirism reflect a liberalizing shift in cultural attitudes toward the erotic—or to something else? 

Topics might include the following:

The sexual overtones of lost vampire films of the Silent Era (there are at least 22)
Comparisons of vampiric bloodlust to contemporary depictions of sexual desire
Portrayals of women as victims or as predators
Femme fatales and lesbian vampires
Vampire film as index of changing sexual attitudes
Depression vampires, Cold War vampires, 21st century vampires
The vampire’s bite as sexual liberation or as curse
Influences from (and upon) romance genres
Vampire as sexual opportunists
Vampires as idealized lovers
Comical romance and vampiric lust
Family love and vampire love

Please send your 200-word proposal by e-mail to the area chair:

Daniel Schnopp-Wyatt
School of Professional Counseling
Lindsey Wilson College
210 Lindsey Wilson Street
Columbia, KY 42728
Email: [log in to unmask]  (email submissions preferred)

Panel proposals for up to four presenters are also welcome, but each presenter must submit his or her own paper proposal. For updates and registration information about the upcoming meeting, see the Film & History website (www.uwosh.edu/filmandhistory)

***

Call for Papers
“The Dark Side of Love: Love, Sex, and Violence in Film and Video”
2010 Film & History Conference: Representations of Love in Film and Television
November 11-14, 2010
Hyatt Regency Milwaukee
www.uwosh.edu/filmandhistory

AREA:  The Dark Side of Love: Love, Sex, and Violence in Film and Video 


Over decades and across genres, filmmakers have demonstrated a fascination with the volatile side of love: the interweaving of sexual attraction and violence.  From the work of independent filmmakers such as David Cronenberg, Atom Egoyan, Alejandro Amenábar, and Lars von Trier, to more mainstream, Hollywood fare, the combination of physical and/or emotional passion and violence in film may be examined through a number of social, cultural, historical, and psychological lenses, in order to better understand the dark, brutal side of love.  

This area, comprising multiple panels, will look at the many ways in which love in film has gone horribly wrong, in the work of American as well as foreign filmmakers, with painful, and sometimes deadly, consequences.  From the drama of Body Heat  (1981), to the horror of Sympathy for Mr. Vengeance (2002); from science fiction thrillers like Vanilla Sky (2001), to the offbeat 9 ½ Weeks (1986), this area welcomes papers and panels exploring all aspects of love and violence.  Possibilities include, but are not limited to, the following topics:

•	Sex, love, and South Korean horror
•	Love slaves and other sexualized violence in science fiction and fantasy
•	Love and Violence in Hitchcock
•	Censorship of sex and violence in various eras or national cinemas
•	Popular and critical reception of Lars von Trier’s Antichrist (2009) 
•	“Snuff Videos“ and independent filmmaking
•	Spielberg’s America: love and violence
•	Sex, love, and violence in the films of Pedro Almodovar
•	Dominant women and brutal men: love and violence in Hollywood drama
•	Violence and obsession: from Fatal Attraction (1967) to Obsessed (2009)

Please send 200-word paper proposals to the area chair:


Karen A. Ritzenhoff, Ph.D.
Associate Professor
Department of Communication
Central Connecticut State University
New Britain, CT 06050
Tel: 860/832-2692
e-mail: [log in to unmask]  (email submissions preferred)

Panel proposals for up to four presenters are also welcome, but each presenter must submit his or her own paper proposal. For updates and registration information about the upcoming meeting, see the Film & History website (www.uwosh.edu/filmandhistory).

----
For past messages, visit the Screen-L Archives:
http://bama.ua.edu/archives/screen-l.html