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See McCay's "Little Nemo in Slumberland" comics--anything but static!  

There's a brief overview that cites "The Katzenjammer Kids" as establishing principles of continuity in comics by 1897 and some useful references at http://library.duke.edu/exhibits/earlycomicstrips/.  Besides Scott McCloud's "Understanding Comics," which is listed on the site, it might be worth a look at Will Eisner's "Comics and Sequential Art" and "Graphic Storytelling and Visual Narrative."

Don Larsson

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"Only connect!"   --E.M. Forster

Donald F. Larsson, Professor
English Department, Minnesota State University, Mankato
Email: [log in to unmask]
Mail: 230 Armstrong Hall, Minnesota State University
        Mankato, MN  56001
Office Phone: 507-389-2368


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From: Film and TV Studies Discussion List [[log in to unmask]] on behalf of [log in to unmask] [[log in to unmask]]
Sent: Sunday, March 07, 2010 12:54 PM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: [SCREEN-L] comics & development of continuity editing

I was reading some material about the development of continuity editing during the 1910s and it occurred to me that comics probably had some effect on this.  However I can't find any material about such connections though my search was admittedly fairly brief.  Does anybody know of such work?  Comics historians are generally focused on visual print (typically starting Hogarth>Topffer>Outcault>McCay>the explosion) with comics-film influences generally seen as pure borrowings of image technique such as framing, angles, light.  Some of the earliest comics, such as McCay's Dreams of a Rarebit Fiend (film adaptation in 1906), were fairly static visually and can be taken as roughly parallel to tableau editing.

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