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Hi Miriam -- I really enjoyed the seminar on the 12th.  We're putting together a whole new web site -- what we're calling a "digital access platform" -- here at the Wisconsin Center for Film and Theater Research, which we're hoping will bridge the difference between the current kind of online catalogue (difficult to use for non-specialists) and researchers who also want authoritative information on the people and companies in our collection.  You can find info about us at http://www.wisconsinhistory.org/wcftr/ .  But our new site won't be up until early fall.

However, here are some other good research sites, mostly oriented toward television, my particualr field:

www.screenonline.org.uk -- the BFI's excellent site
www.filmsound.org -- very dependable info on film sound
http://www.birth-of-tv.org/birth/ -- good material on European television
http://www.broadcasting-history.ca/index2.html -- ditto on Canada
http://www.current.org/history/ -- on US public television

Hope these are helpful -- Best, Michele




Michele Hilmes
Professor, Media and Cultural Studies
Director, Wisconsin Center for Film and Theater Research
Department of Communication Arts
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Madison, WI 53706
608-262-2547

----- Original Message -----
From: Miriam Posner <[log in to unmask]>
Date: Sunday, July 1, 2007 5:52 am
Subject: [SCREEN-L] Send us your links!
To: [log in to unmask]


> The Museum of the Moving Image is compiling a list of trustworthy online
>  sources to help students conduct responsible Internet research about 
> film,
>  television, and digital media. We've put our heads together and we're 
> pretty
>  sure we've covered all the well-known research sites: JSTOR, ProQuest,
>  WorldCat, AFI catalog, etc.
>   
>  Now we're interested in more obscure, but still trustworthy, sites.
>  Determining a site's reputability is, of course, more art than 
> science, but
>  we're looking for Web pages that you wouldn't mind your students 
> citing on a
>  research paper. For example, the Museum of Broadcast Communication's 
> online
>  encyclopedia (http://www.museum.tv/archives/etv/) is a source students
>  aren't likely to know offhand, but might find helpful. The same goes 
> for the
>  Autry Museum's page on Sergio Leone
>  (http://www.autrynationalcenter.org/leone/) and Virginia Commonwealth
>  University's detailed history of the Grace Street Theater
>  (http://www.library.vcu.edu/jbc/speccoll/lee.html).
>   
>  I'd love to hear what you use for online research. It's okay if 
> they're more
>  general sites, as long as they can be used to research film, 
> television, or
>  digital media. Journal aggregators, bibliographies, online exhibits, 
> and
>  stand-alone Web pages are all welcome. 
>   
>  Please send them to me directly ([log in to unmask]) and if you're
>  interested, I'll compile a list of your links and post it to the listserv.
>  
>  Thank you!
>   
>  MIRIAM POSNER
>  ASSOCIATE CURATOR OF THE COLLECTION
>  MUSEUM OF THE MOVING IMAGE
>  35 AVE AT 36 ST, ASTORIA, NY 11106
>  WWW.MOVINGIMAGE.US
>  TEL 718.784.4520  FAX 718.784.3417
>  
>  ----
>  To sign off Screen-L, e-mail [log in to unmask] and put SIGNOFF Screen-L
>  in the message.  Problems?  Contact [log in to unmask]
>

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