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I thought readers of the Screen-L  might be interested in this book.  For more information please visit http://mitpress.mit.edu/0262122561

Digital Media Revisited
Theoretical and Conceptual Innovations in Digital Domains
edited by Gunnar Liestøl, Andrew Morrison, and Terje Rasmussen

Arguing that "first encounters" have already applied traditional theoretical and conceptual frameworks to digital media, this book calls for "second encounters," or a revisiting. Digital media, it shows, are not only objects of analysis, but also instruments for the development of innovative perspectives on both media and culture. Drawing on insights from literary theory, semiotics, philosophy, aesthetics, ethics, media studies, sociology, and education, it constructs new positions from which to observe digital media in fresh and meaningful ways. Throughout, it asks to what extent interpretation of and experimentation with digital media can inform theory. It also asks how our understanding of digital media can contribute to our understanding of social and cultural change.

The book is organized in four sections: Education and Interdisciplinarity, Design and Aesthetics, Rhetoric and Interpretation, and Social Theory and Ethics. The topics include the effects on reading of the multimodal and multisensory aspects of the digital environment, the impact of practice on the medium of theory, how digital media are dissolving the boundaries between leisure and work, and the impact of cyberspace on established ethical principles.

Gunnar Liestøl and Terje Rasmussen are Professors, and Andrew Morrison is Stipendiat, all in the Department of Media and Communication at the University of Oslo.

Contributors:
Espen Aarseth, Maribeth Back, Andersen Bøgh, Jay David Bolter, Anders Fagerjord, Mary Flanagan, Stian Grøgaard, George Landow, Jon Lanestedt, John Law, Eva Liestøl, Gunnar Liestøl, Andrew Morrison, Ingunn Moser, Mark Poster, Lars Qvortrup, Terje Rasmussen, Roger Silverstone, Ragnhild Tronstad, Gregory Ulmer.

"This book is a highly significant argument, on multiple fronts, for an innovator-centered theory of innovation. It offers a reconceptualization of the task of the humanities in the twenty-first century, away from negativity, critical distance, and the backward glance, and into positive, engaged, and future-oriented enabling. The scholarship throughout is remarkable."

--Sean Cubitt, Professor of Screen and Media Studies, University of Waikato, New Zealand
7 x 9, 576 pp., 65 illus., cloth, 0-262-12256-1

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