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I thought SCREEN-L readers and SCMS members might be interested in
reading the  response by the Association of Moving Image Archivists to
recent events in Iraq.




April 25, 2003*
Koichiro Matsuura, Director General
UNESCO
7, Place de Fontenoy
75352 PARIS 07 SP, France*


Dear Sir,

The Directors of the Board of The Association of Moving Image Archivists
(AMIA) express their deep concern over the recent destruction of the
records and materials in Iraq's museums, archives and libraries.
Archival institutions protect and preserve a peoples' heritage. The
extensive damage to cultural institutions in Iraq is particularly
tragic, since present-day Iraq occupies the greater part of the ancient
land of Mesopotamia, where some of the world's greatest ancient
civilizations were developed. These materials are not only unique, but
critical to our cultural heritage and paramount to the foundation of
society.

AMIA strongly urges all governments to observe the principles of the
1954 Hague Convention for the Protection of Cultural Property in the
Event of Armed Conflict.*

AMIA is the largest non-profit, professional association of moving image
archivists in the world. Our organization was established to advance the
field of moving image archiving by fostering cooperation among
individuals and organizations concerned with the acquisition,
preservation, description, exhibition and use of moving image materials.
Currently, AMIA represents over 750 archivists and institutions from the
United States, Canada and around the world. Our members are drawn from a
broad cross-section of areas including film, television, video and
interactive media.*

The AMIA Board of Directors appreciates UNESCO's concern about the
damage to Iraq's cultural heritage.*


Sincerely,


Sam Kula, President*
*

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