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At the UFVA conference back in 1995, Keene St. College in New Hampshire
showed "Dial M For Murder" in 3-D on a dual-projector system, which appeared
to be a permanent fixture in one of their theaters.  Unless they've
dismantled it, I assume it's still there.  Keene State is also the only
school I know of with a 70mm system, although I assume there are a couple
more out there.

        Timothy Shary
        Clark University

> ----------
> From:         Robert Hunt
> Reply To:     Film and TV Studies Discussion List
> Sent:         Monday, December 9, 2002 5:18 PM
> To:   [log in to unmask]
> Subject:      Re: Kiss Me Kate in 3-D
>
> Unfortunately, the only way to see Kiss Me Kate in 3-D would be in a
> theatre that knows how to project the old dual-projector system...if there
> are any left. I remember going to a revival of "Dial M For Murder" in the
> early 80s in a theatre that had been multiplexed. The original theatre had
> been a single auditorium, but was now split in two with both auditoriums
> sharing a projection booth. The throw of the projector was therefore at a
> slight angle rather than directly parallel with the screen and the only
> way to get even a glimpse of the proper 3-d effects was to sit in the last
> row directly under the projector..
> There was a brief vogue for 3-D broadcasts in the early 80s and "Kiss Me
> Kate" may have turned up at around that time, but I don't specifically
> recall it. None of the majors have ever tried a major video release of a
> 3-D film..or at least not since Universal released "The Creature from the
> Black Lagoon" and then quickly recalled it.
> And speaking of 3-D, about 12 years ago I saw a music video by the Judds
> ("Love Can Build a Bridge") that was in a then new 3-D process that
> required glasses, but looked perfectly normal (albeit flat) without them.
> Does anyone know about this process? Can other 3-D formats be converted to
> it?
> 2 or 3 years ago, Nickelodeon experimented with some 3-D broadcasts using
> some kind of system that appeared to work based on color. In other words,
> the image was normal without glasses, but with glasses on, some colors
> appeared to have more depth than others... I didn't get to see much of it
> but it was an interesting idea....
> Robert Hunt
>
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