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Melis Behlil forwards:

> "I'm interested in exploring the gradual integration of movies with
> dance. Clearly, feature films like The Gold Diggers of 1933, Invitation
> to the Dance, and Swing Time should be included. But I need a little
> help with some other choices. I'd like the films to range
> internationally, if possible, and show development of the marriage of
> camera and human movement. That might mean bringing in some Maya Deren
> (say, one evening of experimental works), even some influential
> ethnographic films."
>
> I thought Bollywood would be another place to look at. Any other
> suggestions? She's not a list member, but I can forward her the
> responses.

Norman McLaren's PAS DE DEUX is (for me, at least) a beautiful though
short amplification of the integration of dance and film via special
effects.

Kelly and Donen's integration of camera movement with dance in most of
their collaborations, especially the "You Were Meant for Me" and title
number of SINGIN' IN THE RAIN, is especially worthwhile.

It might be especially interesting to trace the development of Bob
Fosse from being a coreographer (and sometimes dancer) in things in
KISS ME KATE, DAMN YANKEES, and THE PAJAMA GAME to his own CABARET and
ALL THAT JAZZ.

It could also be of interest to see how musicals that were innovative
on Broadway in integrating story and character with song and dance
(especially SHOWBOAT and OKLAHOMA) transfer to film.

It could also be interesting (or not!) to compare a film or two that
absolutely does *not* work on film in conveying the dance: A CHORUS
LINE and Randa Haines' DANCE WITH ME come to mind.

On the other hand, FAME, DIRTY DANCING, Powell & Pressburger's THE RED
SHOES, and BILLY ELLIOT might be included.

STRICTLY BALLROOM and Masayuki Suo's SHALL WE DANCE? are also worth
consideration.

Don Larsson

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Donald F. Larsson, English Department, AH 230
Minnesota State University
Mankato, MN  56001

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