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 Date: Mon, 07 Jan 2002 11:53:48 -0000
   From: "jerryveneman" <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Abby

Hi people

My name is Jerry Veneman and I run the blaxploitation mailinglist
from yahoo.
I've got something you might be interested in.
I've started a petition together with actress Carol Speed to get the
long lost blaxploitationclassic "Abby" released on dvd.

Abby is the story of a black woman (Carol Speed) who is possessed by
an African demon. She then transforms from a nice minister's wife
into a foulmouthed monster. It's directed by William Girdler.
Warner Bros. took legal action against the film, because it was too
similar to "The Exorcist" and had it pulled from theaters after a
short two week run. In 1978 WB lost their lawsuit, but Abby was
never re-issued again.

Fans of this movie had to rely on blurry expensive bootlegs to see
this gem.

Leading actress Carol Speed (Black Samson, The Mack, Savage) already
signed the petition.
I would appreciate it if you can get as many people interested to
sign it.

To sign it, go to

http://www.petitiononline.com/Abby1/petition.html


Please send this to other people who are interested. We need as many
signatures as possible.

Thanks
Peace,
Jerry


p.s. Do you have any tips on who else I should contact for the
petition?

************************************************
Dr. Mikel J. Koven
Department of Theatre, Film and TV
University of Wales, Aberystwyth
Aberystwyth, Ceredigion
SY23 3RD
[log in to unmask]
*************************************************
----- Original Message -----
From: "Donald Larsson" <[log in to unmask]>
To: <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: Monday, January 07, 2002 5:54 PM
Subject: Re: films most frequently broadcast on TV ??


> Stanley Conrad wonders:
>
>
> > Does anyone know whether a list of the films most frequently broadcast
on TV
> > has been compiled, somewhere, by someone?
> >
> > I presume individual broadcast networks could come up with lists of
their
> > own most-frequents, but is there a way to get a more global picture?
> >
> > I suspect the question needs some kind of limits (e.g. geographic) so I
> > presume we're really interested in American film, broadcast by U.S.
> > television stations/networks.
> >
> > We're totally stumped here as to how we might proceed to track this info
> > down ...
>
> I'm not sure how to track it down either, but a few thoughts might help
> to set some limits:
>
> Network (ABC, CBS, NBC) broadcasts of "Movies of the Week" in place of
> regular series programming only began in the mid-1960s, aside from the
> occasional serialized Disney film on the various versions of the "World
> of Disney," and such special events as the annual showing of THE WIZARD
> OF OZ.  Aside from a few pre-cable "super-stations" like WOR, WGN and
> WTBS, I suspect that most programming of the most film showings will
> turn out to be local, up until the 1970s or later.  Of course, with the
> proliferation of cable and satellite channels (including subscription
> channels like HBO and pay-per-view), the question becomes a very
> different one!
>
> Local stations might broadcast the same film several times a week.  One
> NY station had an afternoon "Million Dollar Movie" that showed the
> same film at least once each day, Monday-Friday.  I suspect similar
> multiple broadcasts occured in other large markets.  Local stations,
> especially independents, might have two or three or more films
> broadcast in a day. Even network affiliates might have more morning,
> afternoon, and late-night film shows in the era before network
> programming took up most of the day and night.
>
> For a long time, the most frequently broadcast films were likely to be
> older movies whose copyright had lapsed (which accounts for the sudden
> proliferation and new popularity of IT'S A WONDERFUL LIFE by the late
> 1960s).  Horror and SF films, B Westerns (including such serial heroes
> as Hopalong Cassady, Roy Rogers and Gene Autrey), Tarzan movies, etc.
> often had their own special niches, such as the "Monster Chiller Horror
> Theater" parody by Second City TV, in many individual markets.
>
> And if you want to count short films, then Popeye cartoons and the
> Three Stooges may be in front of everything else!
>
> Don Larsson
>
>
> -----------------------------------------------------------
> Donald F. Larsson, English Department, AH 230
> Minnesota State University
> Mankato, MN  56001
>
> ----
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