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Call for papers: “Visibility and the Politics of Representation” panel at
the Society for Cinema Studies annual conference, May 23-26, 2002 in Denver,
Colorado.  Sponsored by the Asian Pacific American Caucus.  See
http://www.cinemastudies.org for conference information.

Asian faces have been appearing on U.S. screens both big and small in record
numbers in recent years.  Actors Jackie Chan and Lucy Liu are household
names, while the animated television shows ‘The Simpsons’ and ‘King of the
Hill’ regularly feature Asian/Asian American characters.  And of course,
there was the critical and popular success of Ang Lee’s ‘Crouching Tiger
Hidden Dragon’ in the past year.  But what does this increased visibility
mean? What effects have the recent successes of a number of Asian and Asian
American actors and directors had upon
the popular perception of Asians? Are we seeing Asians and Asian Americans
differently, or simply seeing more of them? We invite papers that address
any aspect of the contemporary presence of Asians in the U.S. cultural
imaginary.  Possible topics include, but are not limited to, theoretical
perspectives on the politics of representation, historical comparisons of
the contemporary period with other moments of interest in Asia, case studies
of the career of a single actor or director, textual analyses of films or
television shows, questions of cultural appropriation, and the popularity of
Asian themes or motifs in media such as music or fashion.

Please send a 250-word abstract by September 21, 2001 to Jane Park at
[log in to unmask] and Jeanette Roan at [log in to unmask]

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