Print

Print


I was just going to point the same thing, but it seems
you're quicker than me! How much would students raised
with video and cable television notice a long shot?
(However, notice: they said that Tarantino belonged to
this video generation, and the shot of the foot
massage in Pulp Fiction is really impressive).

Silvia Fernandez
[log in to unmask]


--- [log in to unmask] wrote:
> i just want to be sure i understand WLT4's point
> [though of course
> i'm well aware of the great differences in image
> quality]
>
> seems to me that he   [or she . . . can't tell and
> shouldn't
> presume]  is saying that, for audiences that know
> how
> much "art" is involved in using the long take in
> filmmaking,
> the experience of a significant technical
> achievement is
> part of the experience of the film [analogous, i
> propose, to
> the way we appreciate a tight rope walker more when
> she's walking ten stories up than  five feet up] . .
> . that is,
> we are responding not ony to the diegesis but to the
> filmmaker's
> control of the medium . . . fair enough, if that's
> what is
> intended . . . it does, howeverr, presuppose a
> special [and
> i supect minority] view of how film narrative is
> generally
> experienced . . . to wit:  in my introduction to
> cinema classes i
> often show the opening of TOUCH OF EVIL without
> previous
> comment and  ask the students to tell me what they
> notice . . . even after  i run the clip two or three
> times
> most of the students have not noticed the fact that
> it is all
> a single take  . . . their viewing protocols focus
> exclusively
> on the actions and characters protrayed and in
> effect they
> MAKE  the cinematography all but invisible
>
> mike

__________________________________________________
Do You Yahoo!?
Get personalized email addresses from Yahoo! Mail - only $35
a year!  http://personal.mail.yahoo.com/

----
Screen-L is sponsored by the Telecommunication & Film Dept., the
University of Alabama: http://www.tcf.ua.edu