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There's a fascinating essay by Friedrich Kittler, called "Dracula's Legacy",
in a collection of his essays under the title: Literature, Media,
Information systems, edited by John Johnston, which is worth reading for a
refreshingly different approach to this subject.
Freda Freiberg, Melbourne film historian

Bill Didio wrote:

> i'd like to again thank everyone who has responded so quickly and
> courteously to my query.
>
> the story i was assigned was to dig up and report on any possible
> rumors, legends and media spin that "nosferatu" received possibly
> linking it to the origin of some of the concepts illustrated in "shadow
> of the vampire". my assignment was never to pass these possible rumors,
> legends and media spins off as fact, but to connect today's film, filled
> with interesting yet outrageous allegations (presented as a fiction, of
> course), to the film of the early 1920s.
>
> "nosferatu" of course in turn was an interpretation of a novel, the
> novel in turn an interpretation of other stories and folk lore, which
> were in turn interpretations of historical characters and odd
> occurrences predating 24-hour news documentation and modern medicine.
>
> i'm interested in anything concerning "nosferatu" and "shadow" -- i have
> written pieces in the past comparing famous historical moments to their
> silver screen portrayal...i am hunting for myths to burst:
> - was "max schreck" a real name or a stage name created for 1922's
> symphony of terror?
> - did the producer of "nosferatu" at some point simply disappear from
> the public eye (which could be a myth "explained" by "shadow" with his
> death)?
> - does vampiric folk lore say a vampire has no shadow?
> - other points...
>
> i sincerely hope i've not offended anybody by my serious query for
> information -- i do have a reputation too, in my field, as one who
> researches and checks facts thoroughly, looking for corroboration,
> sometimes to the point of contention with others i must interact with in
> my profession. this is one reason why i engage film historians in
> discussion when i find conflicting presentations of fact elsewhere.
>
> again, my thanks.
>
> [log in to unmask] wrote:
>
> > Let's not let facts get in the way of a good story.
>
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> http://bama.ua.edu/archives/screen-l.html

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