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Stuart,

I remember seeing the late-night rerun of this German 70s show where
they asked people who lived in a certain area to switch their lights on
at a certain point. I think the title of the show was "Wünsch Dir was"
(Take a Wish), hosted by Dietman Schönherr. It was quite popular in the
70s for breaking taboos, like featuring a 16-year-old girl with a nearly
transparent blouse or putting a whole family inside a car which was then
submerged in a pool of water. Anyway, the host then called the power
station to get to know the audience's reaction. This was at a time when
there were only two TV-stations in Germany, so effects could be
measured.
As there was this rerun on one of the regional stations (I do not
remember which one, or when), it should be possible to get a video copy.
Try contact the ARD (German
public television). The viewer's service department is part of the
Bayerischer Rundfunk (bavarian broadcasting), located in Munich.
www.ard.de or www.br-online.de.

Hope this is useful to you.

Klaus


> Hello
>
> I'm new to this list so I hope this is within its scope.
>
> I'm researching an article on very early Interactive TV experiments. There
> are two things I'm looking for. Firstly, people who remember Winky Dink and
> You to share their memories. I have found some at
> http://www.tvparty.com/lostwinky.html but I'd like to chat with people who
> remember this show both from the 50's and its re-run in the 60's.
>
> Secondly I'm looking for any other early experiments. I've heard of a quiz
> that was done on the border of Germany and (I think) Austria where people
> registered answers to quiz questions by switching their lights on and off
> (on meaning yes, off meaning no). The power company measured the
> fluctuations. It has also been mentioned that Australia did a similar thing
> but with toiled flushing and water supply fluctuations but I can't find and
> hard evidence for either of these.
>
> Any other pointer to Interactive TV papers and lists would be good.
>
> Any help would be greatly appreciated.
>
> Stuart
>

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