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April 2003, Week 3

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From:
Alison McKee <[log in to unmask]>
Reply To:
Film and TV Studies Discussion List <[log in to unmask]>
Date:
Sun, 20 Apr 2003 09:59:26 -0700
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Yes, folks have noted this trend -- generally thought to be something of a post-war phenomenon due to mourning and recollection linked to World War II and its aftermath, though some overt ghost films do predate it, of course (Rebecca, Wuthering Heights, both 1939) or coincide with it (The Uninvited, 1944), and are not specifically connected to the war, per se. I'm filing a dissertation in the fall at UCLA with a chapter on the topic, and in addition to The Ghost and Mrs. Muir and Portrait of Jennie, I discuss: The Enchanted Cottage (1945)Enchantment (1948)Love Letters (1948) You could probably include Laura (1944) and many others in your category as well, though in my chapter I deal only with woman's films that specifically address a mourning process connected to the war. Good luck! Alison McKeeLecturerDepartment of Television-Radio-Theatre-FilmSan Jose State University

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