LISTSERV mailing list manager LISTSERV 16.0

Help for PM-DOS Archives


PM-DOS Archives

PM-DOS Archives


PM-DOS@LISTSERV.UA.EDU


View:

Message:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Topic:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Author:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

Font:

Proportional Font

LISTSERV Archives

LISTSERV Archives

PM-DOS Home

PM-DOS Home

PM-DOS  March 2002, Week 4

PM-DOS March 2002, Week 4

Subject:

Re: Using Dos Pmail

From:

"R.Shirley" <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Pegasus Mail for Dos Discussion List <[log in to unmask]>, R.Shirley

Date:

Tue, 26 Mar 2002 23:01:02 -0500

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (105 lines)

[The following is my response to the message quoted below....the author sent it only to me as he couldn't post directly to the pm-dos list.]

Hi DEREK,

Thanks for your response.  Since I joined the pm-dos list over two weeks ago I have only received 11 messages including some like yours encouraging me to keep up the effort.  So I appreciate hearing from you.   I hadn't heard of "TCPMAIL" so I will have to check that out.

I may be able to help you (or at least steer you) with your DOS mail setup.  I'm not a professional, but I've been working on my own installation, including studying and adjusting to changes in server protocols (mostly with SMTP servers) for 5 or 6 years.   SO I'm pretty knowledgeable in the matter of DOS mail.   I think you've accomplished a lot on your own as I know that for myself, it took some significant tinkering and studying over a period of time to get the packet driver and other protocols (PAP/CHAP,Wattcp, etc.) working in the first place.

You said that you were having problems with SMTP authentication.   Until recently, I was aware of only three mail transport program alternatives:  SMTPOP (ver 1.1 or 1.2), SMTPGATE/POPGATE, and PMPOP.   None of them work with the newly required methods of authentication and in some cases, they can get confused with the newer ESMTP protocol even where authentication isn't required.  I've used all three but ALWAYS had to use more than one (i.e. find one that works with each particular SMTP server).    I've not found POP usage to be as problematic.

But first, just to check, are you connecting to the SMTP server?  Many ISP's block access to port 25 of any but their own SMTP server.   If that's a problem, one solution is to find a mail provider that runs an SMTP server on a non-standard port.   There are a few out there, but only a few as near as I can tell (I like to keep my mail private from any possible monitoring by my ISP).  I can help with that if you need details.  One of my reasons for joining the pm-dos list was to find a transport agent that supported non-standard SMTP ports (in addition to authentication protocols....I had been able to hex edit 2 of my older transport agents to send on non-standard ports, but that required keeping and running different copies of the same executable...one for each mail provider.)

You've probably read that I'm modifying FDSMTPOP and will share the results with all.  Currently, it supports only CRAM-MD5 authorization which is just one of the 3 newer methods (the others are PLAIN and LOGIN) and the only one which none of my SMTP mail servers happen to support.   It's taken me a while to decipher the FDSMTPOP code and get my compiler to work and debug correctly.   But I feel confident I will accomplish my objective of adding in the other authentication methods.   You can try using FDSMTPOP in it's current distributed version (I can help you with some example setups), but it won't support PLAIN or LOGIN authentication yet.

I've encountered another apparent bug in FDSMTPOP....it won't work with one of my SMTP servers that doesn't even require authentication.  One of my older transport agents (SMTPOP 1.1) still works in that case.  I hope to diagnose and solve this problem with FDSMTPOP also.

I've also written a 600 line batch file that provides a nice interface to all the DOS internet clients that I have set up.  I got tired of having to re-dial every time BOBCAT or LYNX faulted out and exited, so with my batch file, I don't go off-line but only exit to a menu prompt when a program faults out... and I can restart it or another DOS client application without having to redial or re-establish the packet interface.   It's also convenient in that I now use 4 different transport agents for testing purposes and can run them in any sequence without going off-line.   I'd be glad to share that if you're interested.   I have never used DESQVIEW so that may solve for you the problems that my batch file addresses.

Now to the subject of SMTP authentication.  It's a great help in figuring out how mail servers work to "telnet" to the server and issue commands manually.   Both SMTP (outgoing mail) and POP3 (incoming mail) servers use a very simple command set which is quite easy to learn.   Just use any telnet client, type in the correct server name and set the port to 25 for SMTP (or whatever non-standard port your mail provider may utilize) or 110 for POP3.  (POP3 is just the latest and commonly used POP protocol...I use those acronyms here interchangeably).    I find it very handy to be able to access my mail through a telnet client as I can check and read mail from someone else's computer without leaving behind any record of accounts/passwords or of the mail I've just read.  (All Windows installations have a simple "telnet" app....just type "telnet" in a DOS box.)

As you probably are aware, authentication has always been used on POP3 servers but not until recently on SMTP servers.  I assume the change is largely because of abuse and mostly by spammers.   Many servers today (but not all) allow an authentication method called "POP first" which just means that you log onto their POP server first to check your mail.   Then you log onto the corresponding (i.e. that of the same provider) SMTP server.    To complete this type of authentication process SMTP the server will check the "mail from" address you have provided in your outgoing message.....usually it must be from the same account for which you were just authenticated for POP access.   You wouldn't need any new software to get authenticated in this manner...as long as your mail provider allows "POP first" authentication.   Couldn't hurt to try that if you haven't already....first make sure your "mail from" address matches your POP login parameters.

Other mail providers allow only PLAIN, LOGIN, or CRAM-MD5 authentication.   These methods are processed through the SMTP server alone without any requirement for checking mail first (and often without any requirement as to the "mail from" address in the messages you're uploading).   So they're more convenient once you've got them working.

How do you know what type of authentication your mail provider requires?  Of course, you can ask or read their setup help documents if available but most of them will laugh if you tell them you're setting up DOS mail software!   Or you can try to upload mail and view or log the responses from the server (some transport agents show you everything, some don't....in the latter cases, it would be nice if they had a "debug" feature that would log all responses to a "log" file, but none of the DOS transport agents have a "debug" feature except for FDSMTPOP).  Or you can telnet to the server and issue an EHLO command....that would be "EHLO domain_name"  where domain name can be just about anything.  The response will be anywhere from a few to 8 or so lines.  If this server requires one of the 3 types mentioned above, then there will be a line that begins with "AUTH".   My servers all say "AUTH PLAIN LOGIN" or "AUTH=PLAIN LOGIN" but another variation might be "AUTH PLAIN CRAM".   So this is how you tell if one of the more recently-instituted  methods of authentication is required.   If there is no line beginning with "AUTH", it probably requires "POP first" authentication as there are very few if any SMTP servers not requiring authentication at all.

If you need CRAM authorization, you should be able to use FDSMTPOP in it's present state.   For POP first, you may not need a new transport agent.  FOr the others, you'll have to wait for my FDSMTPOP revision.   There are a few exceptions I've encountered.

An aside:  CRAM is the only really secure method of authorization.  With the PLAIN or LOGIN methods, your name and password are merely encoded in BASE64 and not encrypted at all.   BASE64 is the one of the typical methods used for encoding 8-bit binary files into 7-bit internet mail format and can be un-encoded with a simple utility.

For the following FDSMTPOP config file samples, delete the stuff in parentheses and substitute your own info for mailservers, directories, e-mail return address and port #'s.  Then execute with the following command line.  The incoming/outgoing mail filname extensions are fairly standard and may not need changing....likewise port numbers.  TO execute:

        FDSMTPOP +nameofconfigfile.ext   (use any filename for config file as long as it's specified here)

-------Sample FDSMPTOP config file below.....for SMTP not ESMPT....use to attempt "POP first"------

pop3 smtp                                             (fdsmtpop will check mail first, then upload outgoing mail)
-h smtp.mailserver.net:25                                       (smtp server:port)
-H pop.mailserver.net:110                      (pop server:port)
-m c:\maildirectory\ -qp c:\maildirectory\*.msg
        (incoming directory,  PMAIL message format/outgoing directory/file "ext" for outgoing mail)
-p username:password                       (username:password for pop server authentication)
-f [log in to unmask]                   (smtp from address if different from outgoing message header)
-i cnm                                                (incoming mail "extension"...typical)
-d mailserver.net                                            (domain name used with "EHLO" command on SMTP server)

-------Sample FDSMPTOP config file below.....for ESMTP....use to attempt "CRAM authentication-----
     (see explanations for above example....there are only two differences here...in the 1st & last lines)
pop3 esmtp
-h smtp.mailserver.net:25
-H pop.mailserver.net:110
-m c:\maildirectory\ -qp c:\maildirectory\*.msg
 (I'm not sure why these two switches aren't on different lines, but that's what the example config file had and I haven't tried it differently yet.)
-p username:password
-f [log in to unmask]
-i cnm
-d mailserver.net
-e username:password              (for CRAM authentication...should be same as for POP auth.)

------end of FDSMTPOP config file examples------------

Whew, this got longer than I expected, but I rarely get a chance to share my experience with this stuff.   And I hate explanations that leave out just enough to leave me confused!   So hopefully, I've been of help.   I'd be glad to be more or less specific if you need.  Just contact me.


Regards,
R. Shirley
[log in to unmask]

At 2002-03-25 17:55:00 you wrote:
>I read your thread on pmail for dos with a great deal of interest today.
>
>I've been trying over the weekend to get Pmail running so that I can use it
>inside my favoured DOS multitasking program - DESQview/X. The idea was to
>enable me to access my pop3/smtp mail accounts without having to re-boot into
>WIN98 every time I wanted to check mail on that ISP. (The ISP is use most is
>Compuserve, for which I use Autosig, a DOS off-line reader; for some reason CIS
>still let us access email by simple dialup to some of their old servers.)
>
>Well, the whole experience turned out to be a crash course in the changing
>world of mail servers. I managed to get access to my pop3 account for
>collecting e-mails, although most instructions from the web had to be adapted
>to the requirements of PAP authentication. Using dosppp an netdial (latest
>versions), and using an existing Lynx browser setup I had for a guide, I was
>able to get both pmpop and smtpop12 to collect mail.
>
>Neither would send mail, however and in both cases it seemed to be some further
>authentication was required. I haven't tried the Barebones "TCPMAIL" which its
>author claims to be a less buggy substitute for smtpop - but I doubt if this is
>an improvement. I looked at FDSMTP, but the instructions were too obscure for
>me to grasp, I'm afraid...
>
>The very best of luck to you in your quest for an answer to the
>authentication/ESMTP problems. There ARE a lot of us out here - and probably a
>lot more who have given up on the whole thing; and others just starting to
>search - who would like to be able to access our mailservers using DOS still.
>
>Meanwhile, I'm going to switch off the "send" commands in my email.bat file
>(to avoid the irritating reminders that it doesn't work) and be thankful that I
>can quickly download incoming mail and read it off-line with pmail 3.50 - in
>DV/X.
>
>Incidentally, I joined the LISTSERV today but the dumb authentication process
>won't let me reply on the web. I will be lurking with interest, though <g>
>
>Kind regards Derek/UK

Top of Message | Previous Page | Permalink

Advanced Options


Options

Log In

Log In

Get Password

Get Password


Search Archives

Search Archives


Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Subscribe or Unsubscribe


Archives

July 2006, Week 1
October 2005, Week 4
October 2005, Week 3
November 2004, Week 4
November 2004, Week 3
May 2004, Week 1
December 2003, Week 2
October 2003, Week 3
September 2003, Week 4
August 2003, Week 3
April 2003, Week 4
February 2003, Week 4
February 2003, Week 1
January 2003, Week 3
December 2002, Week 3
November 2002, Week 4
November 2002, Week 2
November 2002, Week 1
July 2002, Week 5
May 2002, Week 3
May 2002, Week 1
April 2002, Week 3
March 2002, Week 4
March 2002, Week 3
February 2002, Week 1
January 2002, Week 5
January 2002, Week 4
January 2002, Week 3
January 2002, Week 2
January 2002, Week 1
November 2001, Week 1
October 2001, Week 1
September 2001, Week 5
September 2001, Week 4
September 2001, Week 3
September 2001, Week 1
August 2001, Week 2
July 2001, Week 3
July 2001, Week 2
June 2001, Week 2
June 2001, Week 1
May 2001, Week 5
April 2001, Week 5
April 2001, Week 4
April 2001, Week 2
March 2001, Week 5
March 2001, Week 3
March 2001, Week 2
January 2001, Week 5
January 2001, Week 4
December 2000, Week 5
November 2000, Week 4
October 2000, Week 2
October 2000, Week 1
September 2000, Week 2
September 2000, Week 1
August 2000, Week 2
June 2000, Week 3
May 2000, Week 1
April 2000, Week 5
April 2000, Week 4
March 2000, Week 1
February 2000, Week 3
January 2000, Week 3
November 1999, Week 5
November 1999, Week 2
November 1999, Week 1
October 1999, Week 3
September 1999, Week 3
September 1999, Week 2
September 1999, Week 1
August 1999, Week 5
August 1999, Week 4
August 1999, Week 3
August 1999, Week 2
August 1999, Week 1
July 1999, Week 5
July 1999, Week 4
July 1999, Week 3
July 1999, Week 2
July 1999, Week 1
June 1999, Week 4
June 1999, Week 3
June 1999, Week 2
June 1999, Week 1
May 1999, Week 5
May 1999, Week 4
May 1999, Week 3
May 1999, Week 2
May 1999, Week 1
April 1999, Week 4
April 1999, Week 2
April 1999, Week 1
March 1999, Week 5
March 1999, Week 4
March 1999, Week 3
March 1999, Week 1
February 1999, Week 4
February 1999, Week 2
February 1999, Week 1
January 1999, Week 3
January 1999, Week 2
December 1998, Week 5
December 1998, Week 2
December 1998, Week 1
November 1998, Week 5
November 1998, Week 4
November 1998, Week 3
November 1998, Week 1
October 1998, Week 5
October 1998, Week 4
October 1998, Week 3
September 1998, Week 5
September 1998, Week 4
September 1998, Week 3
September 1998, Week 2
September 1998, Week 1
August 1998, Week 5
August 1998, Week 4
August 1998, Week 3
August 1998, Week 2
August 1998, Week 1
July 1998, Week 5
July 1998, Week 4
July 1998, Week 3
July 1998, Week 2
July 1998, Week 1
June 1998, Week 4
June 1998, Week 3
June 1998, Week 1
May 1998, Week 4
May 1998, Week 3
May 1998, Week 2
May 1998, Week 1
April 1998, Week 5
April 1998, Week 4
April 1998, Week 3
April 1998, Week 2
April 1998, Week 1
March 1998, Week 5
March 1998, Week 4
March 1998, Week 3
March 1998, Week 2
March 1998, Week 1
February 1998, Week 4
February 1998, Week 3
February 1998, Week 2
February 1998, Week 1
January 1998, Week 4
January 1998, Week 3
January 1998, Week 2
January 1998, Week 1
December 1997, Week 5
December 1997, Week 4
December 1997, Week 3
December 1997, Week 1
November 1997, Week 4
November 1997, Week 3
November 1997, Week 2
November 1997, Week 1
October 1997, Week 5
October 1997, Week 4
October 1997, Week 3
October 1997, Week 2
October 1997, Week 1
September 1997, Week 5
September 1997, Week 4
September 1997, Week 3
September 1997, Week 2
September 1997, Week 1
August 1997, Week 4
August 1997, Week 3
August 1997, Week 2
August 1997, Week 1
July 1997, Week 5
July 1997, Week 4
July 1997, Week 3
July 1997, Week 2
July 1997, Week 1
June 1997, Week 4
June 1997, Week 3
June 1997, Week 2
June 1997, Week 1
May 1997, Week 4
May 1997, Week 3
May 1997, Week 2
May 1997, Week 1
April 1997, Week 5
April 1997, Week 4
April 1997, Week 3
April 1997, Week 2
April 1997, Week 1
March 1997, Week 5
March 1997, Week 3
March 1997, Week 2
March 1997, Week 1
February 1997, Week 4
February 1997, Week 3
February 1997, Week 2
February 1997, Week 1
January 1997, Week 5
January 1997, Week 4
January 1997, Week 3
January 1997, Week 2
January 1997, Week 1
December 1996, Week 5
December 1996, Week 3
December 1996, Week 2
November 1996, Week 5
November 1996, Week 4
November 1996, Week 3
November 1996, Week 2
November 1996, Week 1
October 1996, Week 5
October 1996, Week 4
October 1996, Week 3
October 1996, Week 2
October 1996, Week 1
September 1996, Week 5
September 1996, Week 4
September 1996, Week 3
September 1996, Week 2
September 1996, Week 1
August 1996, Week 5
August 1996, Week 4
August 1996, Week 3
August 1996, Week 2
August 1996, Week 1
July 1996, Week 4
July 1996, Week 3
July 1996, Week 2
July 1996, Week 1
June 1996, Week 4
June 1996, Week 3
June 1996, Week 2
June 1996, Week 1
May 1996, Week 4
May 1996, Week 3
May 1996, Week 2
May 1996, Week 1
April 1996, Week 5
April 1996, Week 4
April 1996, Week 3
April 1996, Week 2
March 1996, Week 5
March 1996, Week 4
March 1996, Week 3
March 1996, Week 2
March 1996, Week 1
February 1996, Week 5
February 1996, Week 4
February 1996, Week 3
February 1996, Week 2
February 1996, Week 1
January 1996, Week 5
January 1996, Week 4
January 1996, Week 3
January 1996, Week 2
January 1996, Week 1
December 1995, Week 5
December 1995, Week 4
December 1995, Week 3
December 1995, Week 2
December 1995, Week 1
November 1995, Week 5
November 1995, Week 4
November 1995, Week 3
November 1995, Week 2
November 1995, Week 1
October 1995, Week 3
October 1995, Week 2
October 1995, Week 1
September 1995, Week 5
September 1995, Week 4

ATOM RSS1 RSS2



LISTSERV.UA.EDU

CataList Email List Search Powered by the LISTSERV Email List Manager