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August 2000, Week 2

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Date:
Mon, 14 Aug 2000 11:38:52 -0400
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Film and TV Studies Discussion List <[log in to unmask]>
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"W. McCarthy" <[log in to unmask]>
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Well, "Schloss" means several things, and one certainly is "lock."
While, in this context, Schloss sounds like a calque
(loan-translation) of the English word, that rendering of this sort
of "lock" might in fact be acceptable in contemporary colloquial
usage (of that I'm not certain). "Ortung" -- position fixing, fix --
is a more lexically sound turn of phrase, but given that German has
absorbed so many English words and turns of phrase, I wouldn't be so
sure that "Schloss" is wrong. And gosh, wouldn't "they" clear such
details of the ‹bersetzung w/ Arnold himself? ;)

:
>(Anyone else here speak german? In Schwarzenegger's total recall,
>there's
>a dialogue between guards who are looking for the escaped hero with a
>tracker device. The device goes beeep, and the following dialogue
>occurs:
>"I've got a lock!" - "Let's go!". In the german version, the guards
>say
>"Ich habe ein Schloss!" - "Gehen wir!" [rough translation: "I've got a
>keyhole"]....)
>
>David Skreiner
>
>----
>Screen-L is sponsored by the Telecommunication & Film Dept., the
>University of Alabama: http://www.tcf.ua.edu

----
Screen-L is sponsored by the Telecommunication & Film Dept., the
University of Alabama: http://www.tcf.ua.edu

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