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November 1994, Week 3

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Sender:
Film and TV Studies Discussion List <[log in to unmask]>
Subject:
From:
"Jason T. Congdon" <[log in to unmask]>
Date:
Thu, 17 Nov 1994 19:36:24 CST
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Reply-To:
Film and TV Studies Discussion List <[log in to unmask]>
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----------------------------Original message----------------------------
 
Dear friends:
 
A friend of mine is delivering an undergraduate presentation on Bandura's
social learning theory, part of which explore the influence that motion
pictures have on people's actions, attitudes, etc.  She is looking for
examples to illustrate this; cases where incidents may
have been strongly influenced or inspired by film, as well as incidents
where the accusation of this connection may have been made falsely (i.e.
violence inappropriately blamed on a movie).
 
We have thought of several possibilities, such as Childs Play in Britain
or the alleged relation between gang-oriented movies and urban violence, etc.,
but any information we can add to these would be very appreciated, be
it other examples or books/articles that address the topic.
 
Thanks in advance!
 
Jason Congdon
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