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September 1992

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Sender:
Film and TV Studies Discussion List <[log in to unmask]>
Subject:
From:
Bob Kosovsky <[log in to unmask]>
Date:
Thu, 17 Sep 1992 10:18:30 EDT
Reply-To:
Film and TV Studies Discussion List <[log in to unmask]>
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Bjorn Sorenssen <[log in to unmask]> "naively" asks:
>If you turn your color saturation knob all the way down while watching
>a colorized b/w movie, will you then, in effect, be looking more or less
>at the "original"?
 
I find that the contrast of a colorized film seen in black and white is
greatly reduced.  I recall seeing TOPPER [1937] (a film where I've had the
good fortune to have seen the Museum of Modern Art's print), and I really
noticed how there was a generalized "neutral gray" of the colorized version.
 
That's one of Turner's first efforts, and perhaps they've improved -- but I
still don't understand anything but monentary reasons why a film should be
colorized.
Bob Kosovsky
Graduate Center -- Ph.D. Program in Music(student)/ City University of New York
New York Public Library -- Music Division
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Disclaimer:  My opinions do not necessarily represent those of my institutions.

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