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September 2000, Week 1

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Film and TV Studies Discussion List <[log in to unmask]>
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Wed, 6 Sep 2000 15:15:22 EDT
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Film and TV Studies Discussion List <[log in to unmask]>
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REVISED CALL FOR PAPERS
PRESIDENCY IN FILM CONFERENCE NOV. 10-12

Submissions are still encouraged for panels on
 "THE IMPERIAL PRESIDENCY IN FILM"

Call or email if you would like to discuss participation in this panel
BY SEPT 15:

American history is littered with periodic accusations of excessive
presidential power: GeorgeWashington, Abraham Lincoln and Franklin Roosevelt
wre the most notable targets of this charge. Richard Nixon's harrowing abuse
of power brought Arthur Schlesinger to analyze the Imperial Presidency in
the 1970s, a phenomenon which he associates with the excessive growth of the
executive branch, combined with the misuse of power. The extent to which
both narrative and documentary film production has reflected this important
component of the American polity is an issue that has not been sufficiently
investigated.  The "imperial presidency" is already evident in films such as
GABRIEL OVER THE WHITEHOUSE (which reflects conflicting attitudes towards
dictatorship)and continues through INDEPENDENCE DAY. Even more, the
president as king--or dictator--is easily translated into the president as
film star, America's version of royalty.

Topics which might be addressed by panelists included, but are not limited to:

--How the presidency is portrayed in doc. or fictional film in terms of the
narration of the democratic process;
--The president as star;
--Comparative analyses of presidential and royal performance and or
narrative structure in film;
--Dictators and presidents;
--Retrospective biopics (JFK, Secret Honor) as indicators of contemporary
views of presidential power;
--The fictional portrayal of presidential power (and any relation to the
sitting president);

A wide range of approaches are welcome, and presentors from outside of the
field of Cinema Studies are encouraged to apply.

Contact Isabelle Freda with proposals or questions: by phone: 212-998-8993;
by FAX 212-995-4904, by email [log in to unmask]

The American Presidency in Film: Hollywood Views the Whitehouse
Sponsored by the Film and History League
Visit the Film and History Website for complete info.
National Conference, Nov. 10-12, 2000
Simi Valley, CA
Westlake Hyatt Hotel,Westlake Village
Phone 805 557 1234
Rm rate: 109/night (single/double)
email directly to reservations at: [log in to unmask]

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